Are there any aircraft with a nose wheel braking system?

Falk
  • Are there any aircraft with a nose wheel braking system? Falk

    I'm pretty sure that there are no aircraft equipped with a brake on its nose wheel, however two of my colleagues think there might have been. Are there?

    Aircraft with retractable gear of course have devices to stop the wheels from spinning when retracted, but I'm asking about brakes used to stop or slow down the aircraft. Please don't consider aircraft with a tail wheel, gliders, experimental aircraft, or aircraft used for flight testing (certified aircraft only).

  • There are quite a few 727 that actually had nose wheel braking, however they utilized it only for maximum breaking power. (Also they were proven to be ineffective and unreliable, so a service bulletin was written to remove the system).

    Saab Gripens use nose wheel brakes to stop as well, the main gear sits farther aft than most planes, so there is quite a bit of weight on the nose gear, which makes it effective for stopping.

Related questions and answers
  • I'm pretty sure that there are no aircraft equipped with a brake on its nose wheel, however two of my colleagues think there might have been. Are there? Aircraft with retractable gear of course have devices to stop the wheels from spinning when retracted, but I'm asking about brakes used to stop or slow down the aircraft. Please don't consider aircraft with a tail wheel, gliders, experimental aircraft, or aircraft used for flight testing (certified aircraft only).

  • Tire preservation Israel Jantzen

    Why has someone not designed a landing wheel with a fin or fins on it so that the air will start the wheels turning before the wheels touch the ground? Wouldn't that preserve the tires longer from wear? Or would it make the control of the aircraft more dangerous in some circumstances, such as rain or snow, to have the wheels already turning when landing? If so, perhaps the fins could be manually or computer controlled for various weather conditions.

  • I've noticed that on almost all aircraft (Boeing, Airbus etc.) the nose gear rotates forwards for retraction. However, on a some aircraft, in particular a few Russian models, the opposite is used: the nose gear is rotated towards the rear for stowage: (this includes the Tu154, Tu134) Is there any logic behind this decision? I imagined it was better to place it folding forwards, such that the gear was assisted into place by the air, especially for manual free fall. Looking at pictures of the TU-154 with its gear down, there seems to be plenty of space forward.

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  • How does autobrake work? Gabriel Brito

    An autobrake is a type of automatic wheel-based hydraulic brake system for advanced airplanes. The autobrake is normally enabled during takeoff and landing procedures, when the aircraft's longitudinal deceleration system can be handled by the automated systems of the aircraft itself in order to keep the pilot free to perform other tasks - Wikipedia How does the aircraft "know" when is time to activate the autobrake systems on a rejected takeoff and landing? Does it apply full brake to all the aircraft's wheels? Is it really used by commercial jets?

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  • In companion to the other question asking about wheel tire tracks. Planes come down and stop with a significant amount of force which I would expect to cause either rutting or potholes. Are runways susceptible to ruts and potholes? And do these cause significant issues for landing planes?

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