Could the CVR and FDR record to the cloud?

cfx
  • Could the CVR and FDR record to the cloud? cfx

    Another enthusiast question. I watch a lot of the National Geographic Channel's "Air Crash Investigation", for better or worse, and it seems accident investigators make tremendous use of the Cockpit Voice Recorder "CVR" and Flight Data Recorder "FDR" to determine the chain of events leading up to- or the root cause of an accident.

    One of the more recent episodes of ACI (Season 12 Ep. 13) was about Air France 447, the worst disaster in French aviation history. That investigation spent two years and $50 million just locating the CVR and FDR which were ultimately found resting 4 kilometers beneath the mid-Atlantic. Even after the recovery, there were concerns one of the drives had failed.

    That ACI episode also mentioned that the Airbus A330-203 in that accident came equipped with a system which periodically transmitted maintenance data to a remote Airbus location in Paris to alert ground crews of possible maintenance issues with inbound aircraft.

    Given that Airbus already uses similar technology for maintenance data (and I think I recall hearing Boeing does too), I was wondering if either Airbus, Boeing, or the FAA, plan to facilitate or mandate that the CVR and FDR record to the cloud or a remote location either in lieu of or in addition to the physical devices installed in commercial aircraft. I would think this would be an accident investigator's dream come true, with almost instant access to vital investigative information, while drastically reducing instances of going without these crucial tools when the physical devices are unrecoverable.

    So, does anyone in the know have any idea if there are plans for CVR and FDR data to be transmitted and recorded to the cloud or a remote location?

  • The basic problem with transmitting CVR & FDR data to the ground from flight is the sheer amount of data that is generated by today's sophisticated airplanes. There are hundreds of parameters being recorded many times per second plus the voice channels. Today's airliners record 500 GB of data on each flight. Take this and multiply it by the thousands of airplanes that are in flight at any given moment, and you can see that there would need to be a lot of bandwidth available for all of it to be transmitted wirelessly. There would also need to be a world-wide standard developed and hardware deployed so that an airplane can transmit the data no matter where they are. Airplanes operating in remote locations would have to use satellites, which are relatively low speed and expensive to deploy/maintain/operate.

    In short, it just isn't practical with today's technology.

Related questions and answers
  • which periodically transmitted maintenance data to a remote Airbus location in Paris to alert ground crews of possible maintenance issues with inbound aircraft. Given that Airbus already uses similar technology for maintenance data (and I think I recall hearing Boeing does too), I was wondering if either Airbus, Boeing, or the FAA, plan to facilitate or mandate that the CVR and FDR record to the cloud or a remote location either in lieu of or in addition to the physical devices installed in commercial aircraft. I would think this would be an accident investigator's dream come true

  • 370 and Air France Flight 447 would have both been greatly aided if these floaties were in those planes. What do you think? ...Without getting into the mess of redesigning existing Flight Data Recorders, I have a simple proposal that I think would help in deep water crashes. I propose that several floating cushion sets... would help find water crashes sooner, but if you add a simple USB memory stick in the center, then have data similar to the current FDR's being fed into it, then finding one of the floaties would give

  • 202 incident, the black box had to be sent to Germany for data recovery: He stated that the box would be examined by "foreign experts" in Germany or France as Pakistan does not possess the equipment to decode the flight recorders. He also stated that the process of extracting information may take six months to a year. The Pakistani authorities decided to send the CVR and FDR to the Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses pour la Sécurité de l'Aviation Civile (BEA) in France. It is not clear who developed that black box. Was it the same company that manufactured the airplane? Also, can

  • Several such devices can be placed anywhere in the aircraft and can deploy when they float up to the surface and are exposed to sunlight. It would be much easier to find underwater crash sites. I don't think it's too expensive to make. Certainly cheaper than searching with ships and other planes for days (as in the case with MH370 and the Airbus that crashed into the Atlantic ocean).

  • of the materials needed to protect their contents in the event of a crash, are quite dense and unable to float in water. I base this impression on news reporting of other airliner crashes (such as Air France 447, which crashed in the Atlantic), where the recorders were found some time later on the ocean floor. Additionally, it seems reasonable to me that one would want to have the recorders not float so... Fleet, which is taking part in the search, says he expects the plane's flight recorders to be floating in the water. "In calm seas, if there were a soccer ball [football] or a basketball floating

  • I was looking through my virtual radar logs one of the days and found this "glitchy" ADS-B behavior. I am almost 100% sure that this is not due to my antenna or setup since two independent different radars confirmed this weird behavior from FlightRadar24. Also A/C before and after this one did not exhibit this behavior. Does anybody have any thoughts as to what may be happening??? Why is the "skew" at seemingly same angle? Is that anything? In light of MH370, does this happen often, how reliable is that GPS data? Tail # N657UA Boeing 767-300 Typical route between EGLL and KORD Time

  • I think i've read that the B787 has a common type rating with the B767 and B777. But I also think I've read that pilots are only allowed to fly two types of aircraft at a time... So when they go to fly the 787, do they have to give up one of the their ratings if say they were previously allowed to fly the 767 and 777? Would the same still apply for say a B757 and B767 which have very similar flightdecks? EASA and FAA perspectives would be appreciated :)

  • about electronic devices in flight, and that's not what I'm interested in. I also realize that airliners already carry an ELT. If a paranoid passenger brought one on board, would these devices function at all from inside an airliner cabin? Some feed GPS location data to a 406MHz locator beacon, and those would potentially be less useful (as they'd have to be at hand and probably triggered manually...There've been a lot of questions lately about tracking aircraft, and after a conversation with a friend of a friend I started wondering: Could a PLB or EPIRB carried by a passenger or crew member

  • On Air France 447 the crew had experienced complete failure of the pitot static system, which meant they lost their readings on their airspeed indicators, but according to the Mayday / Air Crash Investigations episode the aircraft had detected that the plane was about to enter an aerodynamic stall and the stall warning systems were activated just before the crash. How did the A330 in question detect that the plane was on the verge of stalling without the airspeed indicators working?

  • I've found a 737 maintenance planning data document produced by Boeing, which gives a suggested schedule on page 6. I've also found a British Airways Fact Book document, which on the last page gives a schedule. So who decides how often an aircraft and its individual components should be inspected? Is it the manufacturer, the airline, or somebody else? Is there a set standard or does this differ between manufacturers/airlines/countries?

Data information