What FAA requirements exist for electronic ignition systems on piston engines?

voretaq7
  • What FAA requirements exist for electronic ignition systems on piston engines? voretaq7

    Most GA piston aircraft still use dual magnetos for their ignition system, but there are some STC kits available to add electronic ignition to common piston engines, and new aircraft often come with FADEC systems.

    Are there particular FAA requirements for electronic ignition systems?

    If so, what are they and how can you demonstrate compliance?

  • The ignition requirements are pretty straight-forward:

    §23.1165 Engine ignition systems.

    (a) Each battery ignition system must be supplemented by a generator that is automatically available as an alternate source of electrical energy to allow continued engine operation if any battery becomes depleted.

    (b) The capacity of batteries and generators must be large enough to meet the simultaneous demands of the engine ignition system and the greatest demands of any electrical system components that draw from the same source.

    (c) The design of the engine ignition system must account for—

    (1) The condition of an inoperative generator;

    (2) The condition of a completely depleted battery with the generator running at its normal operating speed; and

    (3) The condition of a completely depleted battery with the generator operating at idling speed, if there is only one battery.

    (d) There must be means to warn appropriate crewmembers if malfunctioning of any part of the electrical system is causing the continuous discharge of any battery used for engine ignition.

    (e) Each turbine engine ignition system must be independent of any electrical circuit that is not used for assisting, controlling, or analyzing the operation of that system.

    (f) In addition, for commuter category airplanes, each turbine engine ignition system must be an essential electrical load.

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