Where can I get the FAA data that defines airspace, including MOAs etc.?

dazedandconfused
  • Where can I get the FAA data that defines airspace, including MOAs etc.? dazedandconfused

    I was looking at http://www.gelib.com/aeronautical-charts-united-states.htm, where you can download shape files for Google Earth that show US airspaces. I'm writing some software that has a similar need and need to find a source for this data. I'm looking for data that defines the extents of airspaces including MOAs, restricted areas, etc.

    I have been pouring through the FAA's website with no luck. The link I referenced above says its source was the National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO), which I'm having very little luck finding as well. I think it may have been renamed, thus the poor results. I also called the FAA and can't seem to find anyone there that knows where to transfer me.

    So, does anyone here have any helpful pointers on finding said information? I want to pull it directly from the source to make sure it is always up-to-date and accurate.

  • You are looking for Aeronautical Navigation Products (AeroNav Products) (formerly NACO).

    They have a number of digital products, which should have the data that you are looking for.

    If not, their contact information is:

    Customer Service: (800) 626-3677
    [email protected]

    Abigail "Abby" Smith, Director
    FAA, AeroNav Products AJV-3
    1305 East-West Hwy
    Silver Spring, MD 20910
    (301) 427-5000

  • Take a look at the National Flight Data Center. The data appears to be contained in NASR. I mentioned in my comment that there may be no official source for spatial data, but I think this may include what you are looking for.

  • You may take a look at openAIP. It contains nearly up-to-date airspace and airport information besides other aviation topics. Airspace data is available for download as .aip file. This is actually a very simple XML file that can easily be used in any application.

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