What is the speed limit in European airspace?

Lnafziger
  • What is the speed limit in European airspace? Lnafziger

    In Did this aircraft illegally exceed 250kts below 10,000ft? it was mentioned that unlike here in the US, EASA does not have a 250 kt. speed limit below 10,000 ft.

    So does this mean that are we allowed to go as fast as we want?

    enter image description here

    Mach 8? ;-)

    What is the maximum indicated airspeed specified by EASA when operating in the European Union?

  • Airspace regulations do not fall under the authority of EASA. Each country has their own set of rules published under supervision of their own National Aviation Authority in the AIP.

    The origin of the 250 knots IAS limitation below 10000ft can be found in the ICAO airspace classes definitions. The ICAO airspace definitions include a 250 knots IAS limitation below 10000ft / FL100 in:

    • Class C: VFR
    • Class D, E, F and G: both VFR and IFR

    That means that in class A and B there is no speed limitation below 10000ft / FL100. In class C, IFR has no speed limitation, but VFR has. In Europe you will find a lot of class A, B and C airspace below 10000ft. In the US, there is no class A airspace below 18000' feet. There is class B and C airspace below 10000ft, but the FAA basically put a blanket speed limitation of 250knots below 10000ft, even inside class B and C airspace.

    Also note that ICAO airspace classes are recommendations, countries have the authority to deviate from the ICAO recommendations as long as they publish these deviations.

    Section ENR (En-route) 1.4 of the AIP contains the ATS Airspace Classifications and states includes the deviations from the ICAO airspace definition.

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