What are those thin magenta lines on the Sectional / Terminal Area Chart near Death Valley?

Brian Tusi
  • What are those thin magenta lines on the Sectional / Terminal Area Chart near Death Valley? Brian Tusi

    Due west of KLAS and Death Valley are a large number of MOAs and Restricted areas. On the sectional and terminal area charts, there are thin magenta lines snaking over some of the mountain tops.

    What do those lines represent? They don't seem to be a mode C veil of any sort, and the legend doesn't otherwise mention a thin magenta line without spikes.

    enter image description here

  • Those lines denote areas of the MOA which have altitude exclusions different from what is listed on the chart's MOA table. In this case:

    MOA Excludes Airspace 3000' AGL & Below

    Notice the same style magenta lines are drawn in circles around airports in the MOA which also have the same style remark excluding a specific portion of the airspace.

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