Where can I rent a float plane?

Pete
  • Where can I rent a float plane? Pete

    Is it possible to rent a float plane with a private pilot's license?

    Flying floats is one of the main attractions for me to learn to fly. However, after some searching on the internet I can only find wheeled aircraft that are available for rent in my area. Am I missing something? Are there flying clubs or partnerships that have float planes available? I would love to fly floats but owning a seaplane is not in the cards for me at this point in my life.

  • The Seaplane Pilot's Association publishes a Water Landing Directory that includes seaplane facilities and flight planning maps for cross countries. This lists facilities that offer seaplane rental's. There is a discounted price on the directory for SPA members.

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  • Is it possible to rent a float plane with a private pilot's license? Flying floats is one of the main attractions for me to learn to fly. However, after some searching on the internet I can only find wheeled aircraft that are available for rent in my area. Am I missing something? Are there flying clubs or partnerships that have float planes available? I would love to fly floats but owning a seaplane is not in the cards for me at this point in my life.

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