On a chart, how can I find the frequency for flight following?

Stanley
  • On a chart, how can I find the frequency for flight following? Stanley

    Is there a map I can refer to in order to pick up the correct frequency for VFR flight following while enroute? I know I can request a frequency from ATC as I depart, but what if I want to fly around and do sight seeing, practice maneuver for my checkride etc. for a while, then pick up flight following for the remainder of the trip?

  • In the United States, you can consult the VFR Sectional Chart and look for the frequency box located near a terminal area.

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    Otherwise you'll need to consult the Airport Facility Directory for the region your are flying to find a ARTCC (Center) frequency.

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  • I assume you're in the US? If you got flight following when you departed from a controlled field then ATC should tell you if you need to change frequency, unless of course they have to stop providing you the service because of workload or whatever.

    In general, flight following is provided by the nearest TRACON or ARTCC, so you can look in at least three places, two of which are maps:

    1. The VFR chart, if you're near a controlled field, which shows the TRACON frequencies
    2. The IFR en route chart, which shows the ARTCC frequency for your general area even if you're not close to a controlled field
    3. The AF/D, if you're near a controlled field

Related questions and answers
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