Where can I find detailed dimensions of an aircraft engine compressor blade?

Nicolas
  • Where can I find detailed dimensions of an aircraft engine compressor blade? Nicolas

    I am currently working on the modeling of blade/casing interactions in aircraft engines. The work is carried out in partnership with a company, therefore, there is a limited amount of it that could be published openly.

    Are there any OpenSource compressor or turbine blade designs available (e.g. NACA airfoil profiles for wings)? Where could I find detailed dimensions and material properties?

    The idea would be to use it for publication purposes, thus displaying relevant characteristics and realistic behaviors, while keeping all the confidential data of the company internally.

  • Since nobody's answered this yet, I'll take a stab at it.

    I tried to find some dimensions for you online, but struggled.

    Here's a thought though, could you just buy one?

    For example - £35:

    This is a Rolls Royce Olympus 593 Turbojet engine High Pressure Compressor Vane. This is a flown item that powered BAs Concorde fleet and the blade shows signs of use.

    It was manufactured by Rolls Royce and has the Olympus 593 part number B430542.

    The dimensions of this item in centimetres are approximately 15.5 x 4 x 4 and it weighs approximately 400g.

    There are lots more on eBay too.

    You asked about material — one listing says the Tornado's Rolls Royce RB199 engine is made from titanium.

Related questions and answers
  • I am currently working on the modeling of blade/casing interactions in aircraft engines. The work is carried out in partnership with a company, therefore, there is a limited amount of it that could be published openly. Are there any OpenSource compressor or turbine blade designs available (e.g. NACA airfoil profiles for wings)? Where could I find detailed dimensions and material properties? The idea would be to use it for publication purposes, thus displaying relevant characteristics and realistic behaviors, while keeping all the confidential data of the company internally.

  • I'm thinking of building some of physical aspects of a flight simulator, such as the overhead panels and pedestal. Is there a publication available where I could find detailed dimensions of cockpit panel sizes of say Boeing 737 and A320s? I've found some pictures online but they don't quite have the detail I would like. Google images shows a few results with detailed dimensions, so I'm wondering where they got theirs from... actual measurements perhaps? (there are photos of measurements, but i'd like something maybe a little more exact) Is there maybe a standard size of these panels, also

  • Where can I find nice flutter animations/videos (other than YouTube) to add to a presentation without violating Copyright regulations ? It can either be for wings as well as blade arrays. Are you aware of any OpenSource database on this topic ?

  • With the new Boeing 787 where Boeing has provided the capability to swap engine types if the aircraft goes to a new operator quite quickly, I'm wondering if there are any interchangeable flightdecks? Say that you might have a legacy 737 for southwest, but an entirely different cockpit layout (containing the same capabilities) for a company which operates Boeing 787s as well, since the similarities would make training easier. I know a similar project was done on the DC-10s becoming MD-10s, as well as some Saudi MD-90s to be similar to MD-11, but both of these were long-time consuming

  • Whenever I hear anyone talking about P-Factor, (whether it be single-engine left turning tendencies or multi-engine loss of directional control scenarios), someone always brings up the fact that the descending blade of a propeller generates more thrust than the ascending blade. I'm wondering why that's the case. What is P-Factor and why does it occur?

  • Aged aircraft type ratings Fabrizio Mazzoni

    Looking around on the internet you can still find a lot of aged aircraft such as the 727,737-200,a300/310, DC9/MD8X and DC-10 that are still being used as freighters or in "poorer" airlines. I suppose a lot of pilots that were certified on these aircraft are getting older and retiring. Would it make sense for a younger guy to get certified for these airplanes rather than running for a newer aircraft certifications where the competition would be harsher in order to pursue a career? I suppose that these aircraft will still have service time left as converted freighters thus extending

  • My only detailed experience with carburetors is in aircraft. I'm pretty familiar with the principles behind float-type carbs, but I recently saw a schematic for a "downdraft carburetor" with a choke valve. This got me curious, so I did a little research and found that what I'm used to is an "updraft carburetor", and that (according to wikipedia) they fell out of fashion in the automotive industry in the 1930s. Why is the updraft carburetor design so prevalent in aviation? Does an updraft carb actually have a choke valve? Images below to provide a little context for those of us who

  • I'm from Brazil, and here we use the West/East rule, so we use an odd flight level when we fly between 0/360 - 179, and when we fly between 180 - 359 we fly in an even flight level. But what should you do in other countries? Where I can find those rules? I've heard that in Europe it's totally different, and that in some countries in Asia they use meters, instead of feet. Where can I find this information?

  • I just finished reading an interesting post where the author suggests that the missing Malaysian Airlines flight 370 could have 'hidden' under the cover of Singapore Airlines flight 68 to fly to a covert airstrip. I've read multiple thrillers where submarines have hidden behind the acoustic signal of large cargo vessels to mask their sound over sonar arrays, and this (at least in the book) sounds plausible. I also read another book where a bomber (flying under the identity of a commercial jet) masked a business jet to get it into an area without detection. Naturally, both examples are taken

  • FAR Part 91, Appendix G, Section 2 says: (c) Altitude-keeping equipment: All aircraft. To approve an aircraft group or a nongroup aircraft, the Administrator must find that the aircraft meets the following requirements: ... (2) The aircraft must be equipped with at least one automatic altitude control system that controls the aircraft altitude Note that it does not say that it must be engaged, or even operative. Simply "equipped", and also that this is to approve an aircraft for RVSM. From what I can find, there is no operational requirement for the autopilot

Data information