What is an SIC type rating?

Lnafziger
  • What is an SIC type rating? Lnafziger

    14 CFR 61.55 says:

    ...

    (d) A person may receive a second-in-command pilot type rating for an aircraft after satisfactorily completing the second-in-command familiarization training requirements under paragraph (b) of this section in that type of aircraft provided the training was completed within the 12 calendar months before the month of application for the SIC pilot type rating. The person must comply with the following application and pilot certification procedures:

    ...

    (6) The applicant must appear in person at a FAA Flight Standards District Office or to an Examiner with his or her logbook/training records and with the completed and signed FAA Form 8710-1.

    (7) There is no practical test required for the issuance of the “SIC Privileges Only” pilot type rating.

    What exactly is an SIC type rating used for and how can someone get a "type rating" without any kind of practical test?

  • It's an ICAO requirement, basically it's just official documentation showing that you've been trained and are competent to act as SIC in a given airplane.

    ICAO is an organization that standardizes regulations and procedures among the participating countries (close to 200 if I recall). If you fly as SIC internationally you'll probably need an SIC type rating.

    The rating is almost the same as a PIC type rating, except the rejected takeoff and taxi requirements (and maybe some others) don't have to be met. It's basically a formality for any airline first officer as they will have met all the requirements just by going through the airline's training.

  • Its a box to check to make ICAO happy if you want your operation to fly outside of the US. For a 121 initial training program it literally is a checkbox -- you pass training and have an 8710 ready and an APD gives you the rating.

    Its a formalization of knowing the airplane well enough to operate it in normal and abnormal conditions without the rigor of the PIC type (e.g. as an FO you do the oral exam with your sim partner and as Lnafziger points out, you don't cover the PTS for the SIC type like you do for a PIC type).

Related questions and answers
  • 14 CFR 61.55 says: ... (d) A person may receive a second-in-command pilot type rating for an aircraft after satisfactorily completing the second-in-command familiarization training requirements under paragraph (b) of this section in that type of aircraft provided the training was completed within the 12 calendar months before the month of application for the SIC pilot type...” pilot type rating. What exactly is an SIC type rating used for and how can someone get a "type rating" without any kind of practical test?

  • I'm a student pursuing a US Private Pilot License, and recently scheduled my checkride. I've been training in a 1981 Piper Warrior (PA-28-161), but if its annual goes sour I may have to take my..., they're pretty similar anyway—they're even both the same ATC type (P28A)—but they aren't the same model. Here's the catch: Form 8710, the "Airman Certificate and/or Rating Application", asks... plane was fine, and I can't find any Part 61 regulations that are specific to experience in one make/model aside from adding an experimental aircraft as part §61.63(h)(1), which is what I assume

  • it in the calendar month in which it was required. ... So let's say that I completed initial training in March. This says that if I complete recurrent training in February or April that they consider the training to have been completed in March. So what happens if a year passes and recurrent training is due. I don't make it in February or March, but the company schedules me for recurrent..., as a crewmember in operations under this part unless that crewmember has completed the appropriate initial or recurrent training phase of the training program appropriate to the type of operation

  • Per FAR 91.307: Unless each occupant of the aircraft is wearing an approved parachute, no pilot of a civil aircraft carrying any person (other than a crewmember) may execute any intentional maneuver that exceeds... So if I'm flying aerobatics solo, I'm not required to have a parachute. But if I have a passenger, both are required to have one. What is the rationale for that? I suppose that in something like a Super Decathlon, where the pilot must exit the plane before the passenger, it would be senseless to have one for the passenger but not the pilot. But is there anything more to this?

  • service only where the person holds an appropriate radio operator certificate [...] However, I can't find a regulation saying I need the piece of paper with me. An example of the wording Canada uses in its regulations to say that you need to actually have the document with you is at CARS 401.03 (1)(d) (regarding pilot licences): the person can produce the permit, licence or rating...Is there a Canadian law or regulation which requires me to have my Radiotelephone Operator's Restricted Certificate (Aeronautical) on-board the aircraft with me? This is what I've found so far

  • I know it's a bit odd, but I like using my TI-89 graphing calculator in addition to an E6B when doing calculations. It helps me avoid dumb arithmetic errors. I read the section "Use of Test Aids and Materials" of Recreational Pilot and Private Pilot Knowledge Test Guide (FAA-G_8082-17). It seems to meet all of the requirements except (d), which I don't really understand: The use of magnetic cards, magnetic tapes, modules, computer chips, or any other device upon which pre-written programs or information related to the test can be stored and retrieved is prohibited. Does anyone

  • With only a private pilot license, if not the pilot in command, should I log my flight time? If so, what are the limits of this? i.e. is that as true in the backseat as it is in the front seat? Must I have that type rating?

  • If a pilot has the opportunity to fly as an SIC in a private jet, what FAA requirements must they comply with in order to fly with passengers?

  • and forecasts. (a) Whenever a person operating an aircraft under this part is required to use a weather report or forecast, that person shall use that of the U.S. National Weather Service, a source approved by the U.S. National Weather Service, or a source approved by the Administrator. However, for operations under VFR, the pilot in command may, if such a report is not available, use weather information based on that pilot's own observations or on those of other persons competent to supply appropriate observations. ... Does the FAA or the U.S. National Weather Service maintain

  • (b) Authorization to perform certain solo flights and cross-country flights. A student pilot must obtain an endorsement from an authorized instructor to make solo flights from the airport where the student pilot normally receives training to another location. A student pilot who receives this endorsement must comply with the requirements of this paragraph. (1) Solo flights may be made to another airport that is within 25 nautical miles from the airport where the student pilot normally receives training The student must be endorsed with something along the lines of: I certify

Data information