What are airline "flag" and "supplemental" operations?

Lnafziger
  • What are airline "flag" and "supplemental" operations? Lnafziger

    I constantly see regulations which refer to "flag" and "supplemental" operations. For example:

    14 CFR 121 — OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS

    Subpart Q—FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS AND REST REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC OPERATIONS

    Subpart R—FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: FLAG OPERATIONS

    Subpart S—FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS

    What exactly are they and how are they different from "normal" Part 121 operations? I can't seem to find them defined in Part 121 or 1.1 (definitions).

  • As far as I know, Domestic would apply to US operations of scheduled routes.

    Flag Carriers would be scheduled international operations that originate in the US or a territory and terminate outside of the US. Those airlines typically fall under the rules of the state in which they were registered. So a US airline flying to the UK would be a US Flag carrier. Some operations to Canada are exempted and treated like a domestic flight.

    But it would also apply to an airline operated by the State under the national flag of that country. I don't think we really have many official Flag Carriers in the US (other than standard international operations), but there are a few overseas, or there used to be. Ex: British Airways was the UK Flag Carrier until it became a private company. Same with KLM being the Dutch Flag Carrier.

    Supplemental Operations are usually a for-hire operation that doesn't fall under the normal operations of the 121 carrier and are generally unscheduled operations. This would include a passenger charter of an airliner.

    FAR 119.3 has the definitions as they apply to US carriers. http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/CFR-2011-title14-vol3/pdf/CFR-2011-title14-vol3-sec119-3.pdf

Related questions and answers
  • I constantly see regulations which refer to "flag" and "supplemental" operations. For example: 14 CFR 121 — OPERATING REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Subpart Q—FLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS AND REST REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC OPERATIONS Subpart RFLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: FLAG OPERATIONS Subpart SFLIGHT TIME LIMITATIONS: SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS What exactly are they and how are they different from "normal" Part 121 operations? I can't seem to find them defined in Part 121 or 1.1 (definitions).

  • Is a checkride which is required in order to qualify a pilot for 121 or 135 operations itself conducted under Part 91 or Part 121/135 rules? For instance, is a first class medical required in order to be PIC for the line check required by 135.299 or is only a second class medical required? I understand that in order to act as PIC of a Part 121/135 flight you need a current first class medical, but what about for the checkride?

  • ). The takeoffs and landings at (airport name) are subject to the following conditions: (List any applicable conditions or limitations.) Emphasis on the word TO, in (1). I interpret this as "You must... the student pilot normally receives training to another location. A student pilot who receives this endorsement must comply with the requirements of this paragraph. (1) Solo flights may be made to another airport that is within 25 nautical miles from the airport where the student pilot normally receives training The student must be endorsed with something along the lines of: I certify

  • 14 CFR 135, Subpart F contains the rest requirements for Part 135 operations. The rest requirement for 1 and 2 pilot unscheduled crews (typical) comes from: 135.267(d) Each assignment under paragraph (b) of this section must provide for at least 10 consecutive hours of rest during the 24-hour period that precedes the planned completion time of the assignment. What does the FAA consider rest and what actions by the company will interrupt the required rest?

  • Most 135 training/testing says something like this: §135.343 Crewmember initial and recurrent training requirements. No certificate holder may use a person, nor may any person serve, as a crewmember in operations under this part unless that crewmember has completed the appropriate initial or recurrent training phase of the training program appropriate to the type of operation... that they consider the training to have been completed in March. So what happens if a year passes and recurrent training is due. I don't make it in February or March, but the company schedules me for recurrent

  • There are various services that use world-wide Boeing Winds for forecast wind data which can be used to calculate an approximate flight time between two locations. They usually have best case, worst... in a commercial product? For those of you who don't know what the Boeing winds are, I found this description of their software product on am informal message board (not related to Boeing): PC WindTemp... at a specific location and time may differ appreciably from those computed by PC Windtemp. Therefore, data from PC Windtemp must not be used for flight planning, aircraft dispatch, airborne flight

  • was that this was dangerous to flight operations, and could have resulted in disaster had there been any emergency on-board during the event. Also, that this could result in an unruly cabin... to flight operations? ...Recently, the crew of an Indian airline performed a short choreographed dance sequence mid-flight on the occasion of Holi. This is, a not so rare practice amongst low-cost Indian carriers, who

  • FAR Part 91, Appendix G, Section 2 says: (c) Altitude-keeping equipment: All aircraft. To approve an aircraft group or a nongroup aircraft, the Administrator must find that the aircraft meets the following requirements: ... (2) The aircraft must be equipped with at least one automatic altitude control system that controls the aircraft altitude Note that it does not say that it must be engaged, or even operative. Simply "equipped", and also that this is to approve an aircraft for RVSM. From what I can find, there is no operational requirement for the autopilot

  • 14 CFR 121 and 135 certificate holders are required to maintain operational control of their flight operations: §135.77 Responsibility for operational control. Each certificate holder is responsible for operational control and shall list, in the manual required by §135.21, the name and title of each person authorized by it to exercise operational control. 121.533, 121.535, and 121.537 contain similar requirements for 121 carriers. What exactly is "Operational Control"?

  • Part 135 and (I believe) Part 121 operations all have a requirement to use a source of weather that has been approved by the U.S. National Weather Service: §135.213 Weather reports and forecasts. (a) Whenever a person operating an aircraft under this part is required to use a weather report or forecast, that person shall use that of the U.S. National Weather Service, a source approved by the U.S. National Weather Service, or a source approved by the Administrator. However, for operations under VFR, the pilot in command may, if such a report is not available, use weather

Data information