How should simulator time be logged in a pilot logbook?

Lnafziger
  • How should simulator time be logged in a pilot logbook? Lnafziger

    In a full motion Level C or D simulator like those used by the airlines and for jet type ratings:

    A380 simulator

    How should a pilot log the simulator time in their logbook? I.e. Can you log:

    • Total Time
    • Instrument Time
    • Time in Type
    • Cross Country Time
    • Night Time
    • Landings (including night landings)
    • Dual given/received
    • Anything else?

  • myFltTime.com provides some fairly well researched information about logging simulated instrument time in their documentation.

    You log simulated instrument time in an FFS, Full Flight Simulator. The relevant FAR's mentioned there are 61.4, 61.1(b)6.

Related questions and answers
  • In a full motion Level C or D simulator like those used by the airlines and for jet type ratings: How should a pilot log the simulator time in their logbook? I.e. Can you log: Total Time Instrument Time Time in Type Cross Country Time Night Time Landings (including night landings) Dual given/received Anything else?

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