How many type ratings are pilots allowed to hold at once?

Manfred
  • How many type ratings are pilots allowed to hold at once? Manfred

    I think i've read that the B787 has a common type rating with the B767 and B777. But I also think I've read that pilots are only allowed to fly two types of aircraft at a time...

    So when they go to fly the 787, do they have to give up one of the their ratings if say they were previously allowed to fly the 767 and 777? Would the same still apply for say a B757 and B767 which have very similar flightdecks?

    EASA and FAA perspectives would be appreciated :)

  • There is no limit to the number of type ratings that a person can hold. The world record for most type ratings held by an individual currently stands at 100!

    For safety reasons, most airlines only allow a pilot to be currently assigned to two aircraft types at one time so that they don't start to confuse the different airplanes and mix things up. This isn't a regulation though, at least in the US.

    In your example, those airplanes are the same type so would only count as one of the two that they could be assigned to, but this will vary based on individual airline policy and the complexity of the differences between the actual aircraft involved.

Related questions and answers
  • I think i've read that the B787 has a common type rating with the B767 and B777. But I also think I've read that pilots are only allowed to fly two types of aircraft at a time... So when they go to fly the 787, do they have to give up one of the their ratings if say they were previously allowed to fly the 767 and 777? Would the same still apply for say a B757 and B767 which have very similar flightdecks? EASA and FAA perspectives would be appreciated :)

  • The question Are pilots allowed to let passengers fly the plane? is interesting to read, noting that pilots are permitted to allow passengers to fly. I recall an Air Crash Investigation episode where the pilot pretended to allow his son to manipulate the controls of an airliner, without realising the autopilot had been disconnected, resulting in an accident. I'm wondering how commonplace this is? Is this an isolated incident? On the flip-side, I've heard of at least 3 occasions where passengers have successfully landed planes.

  • Non-precision instrument approaches generally have altitude restrictions which get lower when you get closer to the airport. I always figured these restrictions were AMSL using the current altimeter setting, not compensating for temperature. Some have heard the mnemonic that mountains are higher come wintertime, which basically means that colder weather make your altimeter read higher than you actually are (or, as most pilots prefer to think, you're lower than what your altimeter reads) Have a look at this VOR approach into Newark Most altitude restrictions are a minimum level, so

  • I just finished reading an interesting post where the author suggests that the missing Malaysian Airlines flight 370 could have 'hidden' under the cover of Singapore Airlines flight 68 to fly to a covert airstrip. I've read multiple thrillers where submarines have hidden behind the acoustic signal of large cargo vessels to mask their sound over sonar arrays, and this (at least in the book) sounds plausible. I also read another book where a bomber (flying under the identity of a commercial jet) masked a business jet to get it into an area without detection. Naturally, both examples are taken

  • I was watching some clips from Catch Me If You Can starring Leonardo DeCaprio as Frank Abagnale. I was wondering- If brought a ticket on an airline today, came dressed up like a pilot, would you, be able to sit in the cockpit? (assuming pilots are normally allowed to jumpseat in that jurisdiction) Say you come onboard the plane and present them a fake ID at the door. Is there anything to prevent this from happening, or are we still as vulnerable to this type of trick like in the movie?

  • , probably the first of the day. Having done walk-arounds for a Cherokee, I would like to think that I wouldn't allow such an event to happen on a small plane. On the other hand, I realize that it would be impossible to do a thorough inspection on, say, an Airbus A380. What is a typical preflight inspection checklist for a Dash 8 or similar plane? Would it have included, for example, a visual inspection of the flaps that would have allowed the snake to have been spotted?

  • I know aircraft commonly have rotary actuators to extend and retract the flaps. I am not sure how many but I think I read two per flap on a 747. My question is what is the result if one actuator fails? I don't know if more then one needs to fail in order for a flap not to extend or retract. I am mostly wondering if could cause an aircraft turn-back because somebody told me it could. However... to landing that would be the other scenario and am not sure what the worst impact on a pilots ability to land would be (assuming one failed unit would prevent a flap extension?). Any experienced pilot

  • In a full motion Level C or D simulator like those used by the airlines and for jet type ratings: How should a pilot log the simulator time in their logbook? I.e. Can you log: Total Time Instrument Time Time in Type Cross Country Time Night Time Landings (including night landings) Dual given/received Anything else?

  • months) but I haven't been to training yet, so 135.323 doesn't really apply. From my interpretation of the regulations I would say no, however every 135 company that I have ever flown for continues using pilots until they go to school, or stop flying at the end of the late grace month if they still haven't gone. The POI's have never complained about it. I feel like I must be missing... it in the calendar month in which it was required. ... So let's say that I completed initial training in March. This says that if I complete recurrent training in February or April

  • Typically, a pilot will have airplane insurance (or renter's insurance, if flying un-owned aircraft), car insurance, home insurance, life insurance and then for good measure purchase an "umbrella"-type insurance (usually up to $1MM). Have there been cases where this wasn't enough insurance, or the pilot thought he or she was insured but there was something unforeseen that rendered his insurance policies ineffective of shielding him or her from liability? This question is specific towards American pilots, in this case if would be for an "average" person, owning/flying a small single-engine

Data information