Experimental aircraft regulations

Keegan McCarthy
  • Experimental aircraft regulations Keegan McCarthy

    There are more experimental class aircraft in the USA than any other. That being said, what type of requirements does an experimental aircraft have to meet.

    Also, are there ways around certain regulations? For example, the guy in the picture below was battling with the FAA so they would let him fly his jet pack in the USA over the grand canyon, which they originally said no to, but they eventually let him - is this because he is "famous" and therefore has less rules he needs to follow?

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  • Your first question

    There are more experimental class aircraft in the USA than any other. That being said, what type of requirements does an experimental aircraft have to meet.

    is very broad and should probably be its own question.

    As to your second question

    Also, are there ways around certain regulations?

    The short answer is "Yes". You can apply to the FAA for a waiver of specific regulations. It's commonly done for aerobatic contests to permit aerobatics below 1500', within 4 nm of an airway, etc. The waiver is of extremely limited duration and calls out the regulations to be waived. Air shows also have them.

    I haven't personally requested such a waiver but I've seen them.

    The FAA probably permitted the overflight because the pilot was able to show it was safe, would do no harm, and wouldn't cause them any problems.

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