Does Captain and First Officer Rudder Pedal move together always

ToUsIf
  • Does Captain and First Officer Rudder Pedal move together always ToUsIf

    I worked on Russian Fighter aircraft where both the Rudder Pedals were mechanically interlinked i.e Captain applies force on his pedal than both pedals (Captain & First Officer) move & vice versa. Single Pedal sensor Unit (of course redundant sensors) senses the position and sends it to the Fly-By-Wire Computer for moving the control surfaces.

    I would like to know if this is true for all aircraft (Fighter/Commercial, Boeing/Airbus, etc.) and if not, what are different implementations? Maybe different sensors for Captain/First Officer, different arch etc.

    Also on the same lines, how does Pedal Feel operate i.e, does it takes a signal from pilot pedal sensor or from actuators to provide feel to the pilot/copilot?

  • All? I doubt there's anyone who knows all models of aircraft but it seems the norm at least.
    How they operate depends on the aircraft of course. Anywhere from fully mechanical, direct linkage to the rudder through cables to directly driving hydraulic pumps that drive the rudder to driving sensors that feed data to the flight control computers which in turn drive electric motors that drive the hydraulic pumps that drive the rudder.

  • In the EMB-145 and -135 the rudder controls are mechanically linked in the tail in an assembly that converts torque from the rudder cables to linear rod input into the rudder hydraulic control units. Up until this assembly the rudders are technically independent and the cables for each rudder are routed differently through the airframe so that a single point of damage does not render the rudder inop. The autopilot servo is only located on the captains rudder cables. Through the rear linkage both pilots rudder pedals will move together when either provides input.

    Our other controls are a bit more interesting. The roll input is also linked, but it is linked at the control column, Each yoke independently controls its own aileron -- the CA yoke only flies the left aileron and the FO yoke the right aileron. It is only through the control column linkage that each yoke can control the whole airplane. It is done this way so that if there is a problem with a cable jamming, the control interlock can be disconnected and at least half control regained.

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