Why don't airliners use full throttle on takeoff?

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  • Why don't airliners use full throttle on takeoff? flyingfisch

    It seems that you would use full power for takeoffs, but when I have heard of airline pilots using less than full power on takeooff. Wouldn't it be safer to use full throttle?

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