Are there aircraft exemptions for CPDLC in the NAT area?

Lnafziger
  • Are there aircraft exemptions for CPDLC in the NAT area? Lnafziger

    Another question lists the aircraft that are exempt from the EASA CPDLC rule.

    Is there a similar exemption for aircraft operating in the North Atlantic?

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