Missed approach holding pattern on approach plate

Qantas 94 Heavy
  • Missed approach holding pattern on approach plate Qantas 94 Heavy

    On this approach plate, the holding pattern shown is depicted for a missed approach:

    Approach plate: PADU NDB-A RWY 30 CIRCLING

    However, in the notes, it says to

    Descend to 6000 in holding pattern.

    even though you should only climb to 4700 feet, according to the missed approach procedure:

    Climb to 3000 via 166° bearing then climbing left turn to 4700 direct DUT NDB/DME and hold.

    What does the note actually mean (especially since it seems to be implying you would be higher than 6000 on the missed approach procedure)?

  • That note actually refers to the holding pattern in general, not to the missed approach procedure. Your reading of the missed is correct.

    Descend to 6000 in holding pattern.

    Refers to descent from the MSA or any other enroute altitude. Before transitioning from enroute to the outbound initial segment (departing the IAF) the pilot must descend in the hold to 6000. Once leaving DUT outbound, descend as specified to 4700.

  • In this approach (and several others in Alaska) you may need to descend in a holding pattern from a higher assigned altitude to one that is used to begin the approach. For example, you might be assigned 10,000 ft. coming to Dutch Harbor from Cold Bay on G8. When you get to DUT, the initial approach fix, you would descend in the holding pattern from 10,000 to 6000, and continue to the procedure turn from there.

    As Egid said, it does not affect the missed approach, in which you climb to 4,700 feet and hold at DUT.

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Related questions and answers
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