Is there any reason for why the cabin temperature would suddenly become very high?

Manfred
  • Is there any reason for why the cabin temperature would suddenly become very high? Manfred

    I was flying a Fokker 100 a few months back over central Europe. We had probably just reached cruising altitude when the cabin temperature suddenly skyrocketed without reason, with the air coming out probably around 30 degrees (Celsius). After complaints by fellow travellers it became cooler. Is there any reason why it would do this?

    I guess the pilots might have done it, but I see no reason for it, so could the aircraft have done it on its own accord?

  • Over Central Europe in the winter time, air becomes tremendously cold. Since warm bleed air from the compressor stage of a jet engine is used for cabin heating, the pilots might have set temperatures to maximum in order to warm the cabin. But being in a climb, almost all power of the engines is required for lifting the aircraft, thus leaving only little excess bleed air to be used for heating. During normal days and outside air temperatures this should be enough, though.

    By levelling out the aircraft, the engines are spooled back (less power required than in climb -> hence more excess bleed air available -> higher ability to warm the cabin in cruise than in climb). If the pilots/cabin attendants just didn't realize this circumstance rapidly enough, the cabin is being flooded with maximum heating air from the engines.

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