What are these different kinds of acceleration?

ToUsIf
  • What are these different kinds of acceleration? ToUsIf

    Following acceleration paramters are transmitted from Inertial Reference System (IRS) to Flight Control System (FCS)

    • Flight Path Acceleration
    • Along Track Acceleration
    • Cross Track Acceleration
    • Vertical Acceleration
    • Unbiased Normal Acceleration
    • Along Heading Acceleration
    • Cross Heading Acceleration

    I only know acceleration based on the aircraft axis i.e lateral, longitudinal & Normal acceleration but what these acceleration paramters signifies?

  • I can't be sure without seeing actual documentation of the thing, but I would expect:

    • Flight path is direction of the total velocity vector, i.e. the direction the plane is flying, in Earth-relative frame of reference. This differs from direction of longitudinal axis by alpha (angle-of-attack), beta (side-slip) and wind.
    • Track is projection of flight path to horizontal plane.
    • Heading is projection of the longitudinal axis to horizontal plane.

    Then:

    • flight path acceleration would be simply acceleration along the flight path
    • along track and across track are, well, along and across track as defined above.
    • vertical is vertical; should not include gravity, so when maintaining vertical speed it should be 0.
    • unbiased normal acceleration is most probably what is also called inertial normal acceleration, that is acceleration without gravity.
    • along and across heading are, well, along and across heading as defined above.

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  • Following acceleration paramters are transmitted from Inertial Reference System (IRS) to Flight Control System (FCS) Flight Path Acceleration Along Track Acceleration Cross Track Acceleration Vertical Acceleration Unbiased Normal Acceleration Along Heading Acceleration Cross Heading Acceleration I only know acceleration based on the aircraft axis i.e lateral, longitudinal & Normal acceleration but what these acceleration paramters signifies?

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