Which are the largest planes to have operated on an aircraft carrier?

AsheeshR
  • Which are the largest planes to have operated on an aircraft carrier? AsheeshR

    In 1963, the C-130 was tested by the US Navy for air carrier operations. Have there been any other comparable or larger aircraft that have landed and taken off from the deck of an aircraft carrier?

    By large, I am referring to two parameters: wingspan and weight.

  • The KC-130F that performed the trials from the USS Forrestal in 1963 appears to be the largest, I know of nothing else of that size, weight and span that has done it.

  • U-2s also landed and took off from aircraft carriers.

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