What is "spatted undercarriage"?

falstro
  • What is "spatted undercarriage"? falstro

    The Socata TB-family wikipage lists the TB-9 and TB-10 as having "spatted undercarriage". What does that mean? From the pictures it appears to be a normal tricycle-gear-setup so I assume it's not referring to the layout of the landing gear.

  • If i'm not mistaken, a spat is a fairing for the gear to make it more aerodynamic.

    spat

    An aircraft wheel fairing, commonly called a wheel pant or spat or, by some manufacturers, a speed fairing. Wikipedia

  • "Spatted undercarriage" refers to streamlined fairings on fixed landing gear. They're also known as "wheel pants", although when it comes to comparisons with clothing "spats" is certainly more accurate, as they only cover the top of the wheel, not the entire gear leg.

    The term is semi-common in the US, but I've mostly heard (and used) "wheel pants" when talking about landing gear fairings.

    Spats / wheel pants / fairings on an AA-1's landing gear:

    spats on an airplane

    Spats on shoes on Charles Sumner:

    spats on sumner

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