Is AMS (Schiphol) Polderbaan the runway furthest away?

Glen The Udderboat
  • Is AMS (Schiphol) Polderbaan the runway furthest away? Glen The Udderboat

    I'm very interested to learn if there are (m)any (major) (commercial) airports that have runways further away from the terminal(s) than Schiphol's Polderbaan. Which airport is "in the lead" in this respect?

    The northern end of the Polderbaan, the last runway to be constructed, is 7 km (4.3 mi) north of the control tower, causing taxi times of up to 20 minutes to the terminal.

    [...]

    Newest runway, opened 2003. Located to reduce the noise impact on the surrounding population; aircraft have a lengthy 15-minute taxi to and from the Terminal.

    Wikipedia

  • Pyongyang airport has a runway that at the sight of it is a good distance away from the main terminal. The old runway is 3.5 kilometres, so I think you might be looking at a similar distance here.

    pyongyang

    It's a question of definition though, I think the Amsterdam measurement is as the crow flies rather than taxiway.

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