Descending Distance & Rate of Descent for other than 3 degrees

Artem
  • Descending Distance & Rate of Descent for other than 3 degrees Artem

    These are calculations which I use to know when to descend and the Rate:

    Multiply the ALT of feet to lose by 3 and $Groundspeed\div2\times10$ will give you your required rate of descent for a 3° glide slope. For example:

    1. FL350 to FL100 => 25,000 ft down
    2. $25\times3=75$, so start at 75 nm
    3. GS = 320 kts => $320\div2\times10=1,600$ => -1,600 fpm is your desired rate of descent.

    How do I calculate without using tangents for degrees, other than 3: 2,5; 4; 5 ...?

    In my last question I got it wrong, even though through math the answer was correct.

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  • These are calculations which I use to know when to descend and the Rate: Multiply the ALT of feet to lose by 3 and $Groundspeed\div2\times10$ will give you your required rate of descent for a 3° glide slope. For example: FL350 to FL100 => 25,000 ft down $25\times3=75$, so start at 75 nm GS = 320 kts => $320\div2\times10=1,600$ => -1,600 fpm is your desired rate of descent. How do I calculate without using tangents for degrees, other than 3: 2,5; 4; 5 ...? In my last question I got it wrong, even though through math the answer was correct.

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