Is this an external cannon on an F-16?

dotancohen
  • Is this an external cannon on an F-16? dotancohen

    What is the black pod starboard of the front landing gear on this F-16-I? At first I thought that it was a laser finder, but upon closer inspection it seems to resemble some type of short cannon. What might it be?

    F-16

  • What you seem to have found is the Litening Targeting Pod.

    Northrop Grumman's widely fielded LITENING system is a combat proven, self-contained, multi-sensor targeting and surveillance system. LITENING enables aircrews to detect, acquire, auto-track and identify targets at extremely long ranges for weapon delivery or nontraditional intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. Source

    pod

    The F16 does have a cannon as well, but it's located on the port side under and aft of the canopy: cannon

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