Can a private pilot receive recurring training while waiting for a special-issuance medical approval?

Kaelin Colclasure
  • Can a private pilot receive recurring training while waiting for a special-issuance medical approval? Kaelin Colclasure

    In the last year, I have had to undergo bypass surgery. I am fully recovered now (and past the mandatory 6-month waiting period), but have just been apprised by my AME that my 3rd class medical deferral is likely to take a month or two for the FAA to process.

    I am also in a partnership, and our insurance requires annual recurring training. Normally, all four of us (partners) take the recurring training at the same time, and get a discounted rate as a result.

    As fate would have it, this year's recurring training will fall into the time I am waiting to hear back from the FAA. Since the flight portion of the recurring training (essentially an IPC) is conducted under the supervision of a CFII, can I complete it without a current medical certificate?

  • My understanding is that your medical is currently invalid (because you had bypass surgery and need to get your medical reinstated), so you currently cannot exercise the privileges of your certificate - i.e. you can't act as pilot in command of a flight (or any other required crew member in a role for which a medical is required).

    As Casey pointed out, you've got an out that allows you to still take training (and even to fly generally): Someone else with a valid medical and a certificate appropriate to the category & class of aircraft needs to act as the (legal, FAR 91.3) pilot in command while you're operating the controls.

    If your CFII is willing to accept that role (and the attendant liability) while giving you your training you can go up with them and complete the recurrent training your insurance company requires, but this is something you need to discuss with your CFI prior to going up with them.

Related questions and answers
  • In the last year, I have had to undergo bypass surgery. I am fully recovered now (and past the mandatory 6-month waiting period), but have just been apprised by my AME that my 3rd class medical deferral is likely to take a month or two for the FAA to process. I am also in a partnership, and our insurance requires annual recurring training. Normally, all four of us (partners) take the recurring training at the same time, and get a discounted rate as a result. As fate would have it, this year's recurring training will fall into the time I am waiting to hear back from the FAA. Since the flight

  • I will most definitely start a training for a glider pilot license at our local flight club. This of course requires a medical certification for pilots. The only concern I have, is my blood pressure. I am an 18 year old male with an overall healthy condition. However the last few times I had a doctor's appointment, I had a somewhat high blood pressure (it was always between 150/70 - 180/85 mmHg). Online I haven't really found that much information about the limit of the blood pressure in order to still get the Medical. I have found some sources saying that everything below 220/125 is good

  • that they consider the training to have been completed in March. So what happens if a year passes and recurrent training is due. I don't make it in February or March, but the company schedules me for recurrent training towards the end of April. Is it legal for me to fly in April before I go to recurrent training? At this point, I don't meet 135.343 (because I am no longer within the required 12 calendar months) but I haven't been to training yet, so 135.323 doesn't really apply. From my interpretation of the regulations I would say no, however every 135 company that I have ever flown

  • When I learned to fly helicopters, I of course spent significant time learning about and practicing autorotations. The CFI at my school, who had around 15,000 hrs (that's right, fifteen thousand!) said a few times that practice, knowledge and currency are vital — but as long as you got the entry right (following which you can fly to the ground) and executed at least a decent attempt... might not get to use the machine again, and you might spend some time in hospital, you would live to fly another day. I am assuming a reasonable place on dry land is available to finally come to rest

  • I can see many airplanes circling around to land at KORD. I am wondering if there is a good real-time website or application to track these planes with 30-second accuracy or better. Any ideas?

  • I'm a student pursuing a US Private Pilot License, and recently scheduled my checkride. I've been training in a 1981 Piper Warrior (PA-28-161), but if its annual goes sour I may have to take my club's 1980 Piper Archer (PA-28-181). I have well over §61.109's 40 hours in the Warrior alone, and only ~10 hours in the Archer. I have a separate club checkout and CFI solo endorsement for each... specifically for [II.A.2.] Total time in this make/model and/or approved FFS or FTD (Hrs.) Furthermore, according to the IACRA FAQ ("I'm a Designated Examiner. I noticed a mistake when reviewing the IACRA

  • I'm a low time PPL. In my personal opinion, practice pans, perhaps one or two a year, are a good thing. Practice in a procedure that builds confidence removes one more item from the pucker factor list if it does all go wrong and lets your brain focus on the situation. The D&D cell are always happy to assist and I know that they welcome it as it gives them practice as much as it does me. They are always excellent and it's comforting to know that they are there if I ever need them for real. However, I know that many pro pilots do not approve of this. I am aware that they are often

  • of the date of examination shown on the medical certificate. So this clearly states that if I pass my medical on January 1st 2014 then my medical is good until the end of the day on January 31st 2015. ICAO Rule: However, I have been told that ICAO rules state that the medical expires 12 months to the day from when it was issued, which would mean that it would no longer be valid as of January 1st, 2015. (A reference for this would be great.) Question: As the holder of an FAA pilot license, with the above FAA issued medical, may I legally fly outside of the US after January 1st 2015

  • I was taught during my private pilot training to only provide the minimum information necessary to the FAA when they ask for something so that you don't open yourself up to more scrutiny. In that spirit, what am I legally required to provide to an FAA inspector during a ramp check? If they ask for something, can I tell them "No" or "I will respond to that in writing within 30 days after I have my lawyer review your question"? In my car, I can refuse to let them look inside unless they have a search warrant. Does the same apply with a private airplane?

  • There are various services that use world-wide Boeing Winds for forecast wind data which can be used to calculate an approximate flight time between two locations. They usually have best case, worst case, and average case for each location, altitude, and date in the future. I have searched and searched Google to no avail. Where can this wind data be found, and how can it be used in a commercial product? For those of you who don't know what the Boeing winds are, I found this description of their software product on am informal message board (not related to Boeing): PC WindTemp

Data information