Is there a list of what information different airlines track about their flights?

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  • Is there a list of what information different airlines track about their flights? raxacoricofallapatorius

    It has been suggested in the media and in some answers here that airlines vary in the information they track about the status of their flights. Is there a publicly available resource that lists what information different airlines have about the location and status of their flights? For example, could a British Airways flight over the Atlantic or the middle of the Pacific have "vanished" in the same way that the Malaysian flight over the Gulf of Thailand?

  • There is no particular list that provided by airlines company about their flights because it can be misused, but several statuses are provided:

    Geographic Coverage - FlightStats provides definitive information for approximately 99.5% of U.S. flights, and better than 86% of flights worldwide.

    Completeness - FlightStats queries multiple sources to create a record for each flight enabling us to offer a broader range of information (for example, gate information).

    Accuracy - We have invested heavily in the areas of parsing, interpretation and error checking and developed the logic that enables handling of difficult issues such as cancellations, diversions and changing schedules.

    Codeshare Support - Our codeshare logic enables us to deliver flight information for both the operating and the marketing carriers, filling what is often a major gap in coverage.

    Real-time data sources include:

    • FAA ASDI Data Feed
    • European Data Feed
    • GDS (Sabre, Amadeus, Apollo, Galileo)
    • Direct Airport / Airline Data Feeds

    Batch data sources include:

    • Innovata Schedules
    • TSA Security Wait Times
    • Security Information
    • Health Information
    • Consular Information

Related questions and answers
  • It has been suggested in the media and in some answers here that airlines vary in the information they track about the status of their flights. Is there a publicly available resource that lists what information different airlines have about the location and status of their flights? For example, could a British Airways flight over the Atlantic or the middle of the Pacific have "vanished" in the same way that the Malaysian flight over the Gulf of Thailand?

  • I have been using an Android app to track flights. Their information is pulled from their own proprietary database, and some (with 5 minute delay) from the FAA. I was thinking about making an app that would do this as well by pulling from multiple data sources. What are some good APIs, either paid or free, that gives you near realtime data of flying aircraft?

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  • I have flown a bunch of times on a Bombardier Dash-8 Q400 on a couple of different airlines, and several times I have flown a shuttle flight that is basically empty. I have been instructed to change seats on these flights, reportadly to balance the plane better. It appears as though the request comes from the cockpit relayed back to the cabin staff. The plane appears to be static in place, so how do they determine that they need to balance the plane? Does the landing gear report this sort of info? A Dash-8 is a reasonably 'large' airplane that it seems sort of surprising that the balance

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Data information