How do airlines choose what food to serve?

Danny Beckett
  • How do airlines choose what food to serve? Danny Beckett

    I'd imagine there are probably reasons behind the choice of food that airlines serve, and I'm wondering what those reasons are?

    I guess that Air India probably serves more curries than American Airlines, but what other considerations are taken into account? Presumably weight is one.

  • 1. Money

    Meals are available at different prices. Most US airlines know you aren't choosing them on the basis of cuisine and pick the lowest priced meal they can get away with. Other airlines eg Emirates, Singapore compete by offering high customer services and so invest more money in better food and service.

    2. Culture

    Airlines which are mostly flying a home market will adapt the food to the traditions of the country. EL-AL aren't going to be serving bacon cheese-burgers and Air India used to do very good veggie curries.

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