Auto rotation on the MD 900

Lucas Kauffman
  • Auto rotation on the MD 900 Lucas Kauffman

    The MD-900 is a helicopter which seems to be quite popular with law enforcement agencies.

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    As you can see, instead of an anti-torque tail rotor, a fan exhaust is directed out slots in the tail boom. I was wondering if this works in regards to auto rotation, should the aircraft lose its engines.

  • According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/NOTAR the NOTAR fan is driven by the main rotor transmission. This will ensure maneuverability during autorotation.

Related questions and answers
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