Is a dancing crew dangerous?

AsheeshR
  • Is a dancing crew dangerous? AsheeshR

    Recently, the crew of an Indian airline performed a short choreographed dance sequence mid-flight on the occasion of Holi. This is, a not so rare practice amongst low-cost Indian carriers, who organize such dance sequences to celebrate special festivals (since festivals are a huge part of Indian culture, plus publicity for the airline afterwards).

    Here is a YouTube video.


    One of the pilots can be seen recording the dance on his camera.

    SpiceJet specially planned this event, and had extra cabin crew on-board the flight as a precaution. Also, during the dance, one of the pilots was in the cockpit while the other one was outside, following standard regulations.

    DGCA however, got wind of this, and turned out to be not in a very festive mood.

    Mid-air Holi celebrations aboard eight flights have cost SpiceJet heavily, with the DGCA issuing show cause notice to the airline and suspending two of its pilots.

    Here's another news link.

    One of the arguments made by the DGCA was that this was dangerous to flight operations, and could have resulted in disaster had there been any emergency on-board during the event. Also, that this could result in an unruly cabin environment where in-flight safety of the crew and passengers would be affected.

    Were the actions (suspension of pilots and showcause notice to the airline) justified? Is a dancing cabin crew dangerous to flight operations?

  • Well I suppose the answer depends on whether or not the flight crew are good dancers: If my uncoordinated self was trying to bust a move in an airline cabin I'd probably wind up kicking someone in the face, but these folks seem to be doing OK.
    I can only assume dance lessons are part of SpiceJet's crew training program :-)


    Alright, in all seriousness - there is increased risk any time every person onboard isn't securely strapped into their seats. There have been incidents (recent ones) where flight crew walking about the cabin have been injured due to unexpected turbulence, and those same unrestrained people can essentially become human projectiles to injure others onboard.
    That said I personally don't think the cabin crew doing a mid-flight dance routine poses a significant safety risk.

    The fact that one of the pilots was out of the cockpit recording it is slightly more questionable, and may be what has the DGCA upset in this situation. While there are procedures for having one pilot off the flight deck those provisions are generally for necessary things (like a trip to the bathroom, or investigating a systems fault). The intent is for the cockpit to be manned by two qualified pilots at all times.
    If an emergency were to have happened during this dance routine the pilot we see in the video would have had to get back to the cockpit, strap in, and put on a headset (& possibly an oxygen mask) before being of much use.

Related questions and answers
  • aboard eight flights have cost SpiceJet heavily, with the DGCA issuing show cause notice to the airline and suspending two of its pilots. Here's another news link. One of the arguments made by the DGCA was that this was dangerous to flight operations, and could have resulted in disaster had there been any emergency on-board during the event. Also, that this could result in an unruly cabin... of the pilots can be seen recording the dance on his camera. SpiceJet specially planned this event, and had extra cabin crew on-board the flight as a precaution. Also, during the dance, one of the pilots

  • I've noticed that on some airlines (I may have seen it on SAS) the cabin crew had a small touchscreen at the front of the plane which they were using to select recorded audio messages etc, in both their language, and English. Searching the internet, I found out it's called a Flight Attendant Panel — here are some photos I found: So I gather they can control the lighting, and movies; but what else can these panels do? I also found a FAP trainer, which says: This virtual training environment generates a realistic FAP representation including OBRM, CAM and PRAM What

  • about electronic devices in flight, and that's not what I'm interested in. I also realize that airliners already carry an ELT. If a paranoid passenger brought one on board, would these devices function at all from inside an airliner cabin? Some feed GPS location data to a 406MHz locator beacon, and those would potentially be less useful (as they'd have to be at hand and probably triggered manually...There've been a lot of questions lately about tracking aircraft, and after a conversation with a friend of a friend I started wondering: Could a PLB or EPIRB carried by a passenger or crew member

  • In the first part of this YouTube video, you can see an aircraft supposedly flying 4x faster than the surrounding aircraft, at the time the Malaysian 777 went missing. After replaying this on Flight Radar 24, KAL672 departs Kuala Lumpa a short while before MAS370. It then does a 180, flies back towards the airport, then appears to do another 180 and rockets across the ocean: Here are the playback links for 2014-03-07 16:55: KAL672 and MAS370. Essentially, my question is, what is this oddity that FR24 is showing? (to ward off conspiracy theorist nuts).

  • I was looking through my virtual radar logs one of the days and found this "glitchy" ADS-B behavior. I am almost 100% sure that this is not due to my antenna or setup since two independent different radars confirmed this weird behavior from FlightRadar24. Also A/C before and after this one did not exhibit this behavior. Does anybody have any thoughts as to what may be happening??? Why... of occurrence is approximately: 3/16/2014 6:09pm CST I have also verified FlightAware is ALSO showing the same weird glitch. See below "yellow" highlighted airplane: Same A/C from FlightRadar24

  • Something that just popped into my head: I've been on a few easyJet and Ryanair flights where a lot of passengers clap and cheer on touchdown. Would the pilots be able to hear this? Here's an example I found by searching YouTube: It seems pretty commonplace... but can the pilots hear them? I guess it would be distracting. Just something I was wondering!

  • I hope this is a relevant place for me to ask a math question regarding aircraft design. I am trying to understand how one would implement a controller to control the pitch angle of an airplane for a small exercise. I understand the control part and its implementation. What I do not grasp is how one acquires the longitudinal equations of motions (which are then used for the control part) which serves as the starting point. What is the starting point or what are the principles used to derive these equations? If I know how to derive these equations for a very simple case, then I know I have

  • REGHI UN480 ETIKI NATD DOVEY LACKS BERGH L454 OWENZ CAMRN CAMRN4 I asked a similar question in the past. This is what I want to know: What are the reasons which can cause a commercial flight to change its path mid-route? How it is planed and executed? I am sure the captain is the final authority on this, but who else is informed? 1Route Source: FlightAware. P.S.: I could not understand...Looking at the paths of the same flight on two different days, I noticed they flew very different paths. Short Path:1 YAY N184B TOPPS ENE PARCH1 Long Path:1 NIBAX G462 TUMAK UL602 ORSOL UL602

  • My only detailed experience with carburetors is in aircraft. I'm pretty familiar with the principles behind float-type carbs, but I recently saw a schematic for a "downdraft carburetor" with a choke valve. This got me curious, so I did a little research and found that what I'm used to is an "updraft carburetor", and that (according to wikipedia) they fell out of fashion in the automotive industry in the 1930s. Why is the updraft carburetor design so prevalent in aviation? Does an updraft carb actually have a choke valve? Images below to provide a little context for those of us who

  • The Soloy Dual Pac apparently allows two engines to rotate one propeller -- here's a picture of it on an Otter: Is this recognised as a centreline thrust twin engine aircraft, a "standard" twin engine aircraft or just an aircraft with a single engine for FAA certification? What about for pilot licensing?

Data information