What are the requirements for a PPL to upgrade from SEL to MEL?

kevin42
  • What are the requirements for a PPL to upgrade from SEL to MEL? kevin42

    Reading the requirements for MEL it is confusing which things must be done in a multi-engine, and which things carry over from SEL. If I already have SEL do I need to do a cross country in a multi-engine? Assuming I can meet the PTS for MEL, what other requirements are there?

  • The appropriate paragraph of Part 61 of CFR 14 is 61.63 (emphasis mine, the 'unless' part does not apply in your case):

    (c) Additional aircraft class rating. A person who applies for an additional class rating on a pilot certificate:

    (1) Must have a logbook or training record endorsement from an authorized instructor attesting that the person was found competent in the appropriate aeronautical knowledge areas and proficient in the appropriate areas of operation.

    (2) Must pass the practical test.

    (3) Need not meet the specified training time requirements prescribed by this part that apply to the pilot certificate for the aircraft class rating sought; unless, the person only holds a lighter-than-air category rating with a balloon class rating and is seeking an airship class rating, then that person must receive the specified training time requirements and possess the appropriate aeronautical experience.

    (4) Need not take an additional knowledge test, provided the applicant holds an airplane, rotorcraft, powered-lift, weight-shift-control aircraft, powered parachute, or airship rating at that pilot certificate level.

    So, to answer your question, no, you do not need a cross-country, you do not need any solo time in a multiengine airplane, either. All you need is a sign off from your instructor.

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