Can pilots hear their passengers clapping on touchdown?

Danny Beckett
  • Can pilots hear their passengers clapping on touchdown? Danny Beckett

    Something that just popped into my head: I've been on a few easyJet and Ryanair flights where a lot of passengers clap and cheer on touchdown. Would the pilots be able to hear this?

    Here's an example I found by searching YouTube:

    It seems pretty commonplace... but can the pilots hear them? I guess it would be distracting.

    Just something I was wondering!

  • We can in my airplane:

    Falcon 50

    Quite frankly, I'm usually a little insulted when it happens.

    Were they actually so fearful for their lives and are now so happy to be alive that they need to applaud the heroic pilots? Sorry, but unless it's a true emergency and we did actually just save their lives, I'm not putting them in a situation where they are actually at risk. In this case, I was just doing my job. Do you applaud the waiter or waitress who gets your order right?? :-)

    As far as airliners, I'm pretty sure that the pilots can hear you too if everyone is clapping but someone with experience on that should confirm whether or not this is true.


    Disclaimer: This isn't the actual airplane that I fly, but it is the same kind. Notice also that we don't have a door to our cockpit so this makes it much easier to hear what is going on in back.

  • In my 10 years of flying 747s on international flights, there was no way we would know of passenger reactions upon landing unless one of the cabin staff told us, and that was rare.

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Data information