What training is required for pilots conducting ASETPA operations?

Qantas 94 Heavy
  • What training is required for pilots conducting ASETPA operations? Qantas 94 Heavy

    In Australia, aircraft approved for ASETPA operations are certain single-engine turbines allowed to be operated commercially under IFR. While I understand that the manufacturer is required to meet a series of requirement, I'm not so sure about whether the pilots in ASETPA operations need special training or approval. Is extra training and/or testing required, and if so, how extensive is it?

  • According to the CASA AOC Handbook, section 15.3.1.2, pilots do need to have specific training. Most of this training is regarding engine failures and emergency landings, in some situations in IMC.

    CASA requires that all ASETPA operators have a training and checking organisation.

    The CASA Inspector will verify that for ASETPA operator’s the following additional procedures are included within the training and checking organisation:

    • Engine failure or malfunction which necessitates stopping the aircraft on the ground
    • Engine failure or malfunction which necessitates an off-airport landing after take- off on the most suitable terrain in the vicinity of the aerodrome. These can be organised into a number of procedures, depending on the height of the aircraft at the time of the failure
    • Engine failure or malfunction which necessitates turning to execute a glide landing upon a serviceable runway, including a ‘turn-back’ manoeuvre. This procedure is to contain a minimum indicated airspeeds and altitudes
    • Engine malfunction, during climb, cruise and descent and from the approach to land phase in VMC and IMC
    • Additional procedures for the conduct of a forced landing in IMC to ground level

    The next section discusses route limitations, which I am assuming the pilots should at least be familiar with.

Related questions and answers
  • it in the calendar month in which it was required. ... So let's say that I completed initial training in March. This says that if I complete recurrent training in February or April that they consider the training to have been completed in March. So what happens if a year passes and recurrent training is due. I don't make it in February or March, but the company schedules me for recurrent... holder's operations. Before that though, 14 CFR 135.323 states: §135.323 - Training program: General. ... (b) Whenever a crewmember who is required to take recurrent training under

  • In Australia, aircraft approved for ASETPA operations are certain single-engine turbines allowed to be operated commercially under IFR. While I understand that the manufacturer is required to meet a series of requirement, I'm not so sure about whether the pilots in ASETPA operations need special training or approval. Is extra training and/or testing required, and if so, how extensive is it?

  • Recently, the crew of an Indian airline performed a short choreographed dance sequence mid-flight on the occasion of Holi. This is, a not so rare practice amongst low-cost Indian carriers, who... of the pilots can be seen recording the dance on his camera. SpiceJet specially planned this event, and had extra cabin crew on-board the flight as a precaution. Also, during the dance, one of the pilots... aboard eight flights have cost SpiceJet heavily, with the DGCA issuing show cause notice to the airline and suspending two of its pilots. Here's another news link. One of the arguments made by the DGCA

  • I've seen on numerous different constant-speed propeller aircraft and different pilots using different RPMs during the cruise phase on a propeller aircraft. What dictates the RPM used during normal cruise operations, and why is that the case? Often there are multiple possible throttle/RPM combinations that deliver the same power, so where would you pick one or the other?

  • So the EGT gauge on the 172 (and other cessna singles?) doesn't have a numerical scale on it, just markings every 25 degrees. I know that one is supposed to use the EGT for leaning operations (ROP, LOP, what have you), but it's always stymied me that there are no actual numbers on it. Any reason why this is so?

  • When flying on a long-haul airliner flight in economy, often you find it very hard to fall asleep (at least I do). However, when off cockpit duties, they still have to get rest so that they are able to control the aircraft without being exhausted and collapsing on the controls when they are on duty. Are there are any specific methods of helping pilots to gain the rest required on board an aircraft? Has there been any studies about the effectiveness of these?

  • or to an Examiner with his or her logbook/training records and with the completed and signed FAA Form 8710-1. (7) There is no practical test required for the issuance of the “SIC Privileges Only...14 CFR 61.55 says: ... (d) A person may receive a second-in-command pilot type rating for an aircraft after satisfactorily completing the second-in-command familiarization training requirements under paragraph (b) of this section in that type of aircraft provided the training was completed within the 12 calendar months before the month of application for the SIC pilot type

  • the student pilot normally receives training to another location. A student pilot who receives this endorsement must comply with the requirements of this paragraph. (1) Solo flights may be made to another airport that is within 25 nautical miles from the airport where the student pilot normally receives training The student must be endorsed with something along the lines of: I certify that (First name, MI, Last name) has received the required training of section 61.93(b)(1). I have determined that he/she is proficient to practice solo takeoffs and landings at (airport name

  • StallSpin's answer on the recent question about VFR traffic patterns has got me thinking about the "Remarks" section of the Airport/Facility Directory. We are all taught in training to review the AFD entry for airports we intend to visit (part of FAR 91.103's "become familiar with all available information" requirement), and to comply with any restrictions noted - typically things like "no touch-and-go landings", "Standard traffic pattern required of all aircraft", "Prior Permission Required for jet aircraft", etc. Aside from it being The Right Thing To Do, and avoiding the possibility

  • shortage". Are there really so many pilots out there that the competition for jobs drives down starting salaries so low? I am hoping to understand why it is that well-qualified pilots appear to have so... can't compete with pilots willing to work for $17k/yr. For comparison, federal minimum wage is currently just over $15K/yr. Why are the starting salaries at US Regional Airlines so low? It seems odd that pilots go through extensive training which takes a great deal of time and expense, but they have to be prepared to work for what is a very low salary compared to other jobs that require a high

Data information