Where can I go to sit in the cockpit of a Boeing?

Danny Beckett
  • Where can I go to sit in the cockpit of a Boeing? Danny Beckett

    This might sound like a silly question to some, but is it possible to go and sit in the cockpit of a Boeing 737, somewhere in the UK? (Otherwise in Europe, or beyond).

    Maybe at a museum or something? I'm building a [currently tiny] home cockpit based on a 737, and I'd like to see how the real thing looks and feels.

    I tried searching online, but I couldn't find anything.

    Hope this isn't too dumb of a question, i.e. "not possible Jim!"

  • There is a company called Flight Experience which builds 737 simulators and offers their use to the public. These are fully certified simulators and are frequently used by commercial pilots for currency training.

    Their closest location to London appears to be in Paris.

    I had an opportunity to fly one of their simulators a few years ago, and it was a lot of fun. We spent some time doing landings at the old Kai Tak airport in Hong Kong.

  • Cotswold Airport, near the village of Kemble in Gloucestershire, England.

    Cotswolds landing strip, has become the busiest aviation scrapyard in the world.

    Usually the cockpit parts are taken out before they end up there, but you never know; you may get lucky and they grant you access for a day. I don't see why not!

    Chevron Aircraft Maintenance Ltd is responsible for the dismantling of all Boeing 737 series aircraft.

  • Bournemouth aviation museum?

    BOURNEMOUTH’S popular aviation museum has a new addition – of a more recent vintage.

    The distinctive exhibit is an old Palmair jet, a familiar sight at the airport until the carrier closed three years ago.

    The Boeing 737-200 carried tens of thousands of holidaymakers from Bournemouth Airport, before being replaced by a more modern plane.

    The front half of the white fuselage was unveiled at the museum along Parley Lane last week.

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  • This is a little bit of an "outside of the box" answer, and I won't be accepting it. I'm just sharing it so there are more ideas of places to do this.

    Virgin Experience Days offer 15 minutes of 737 simulator time to newbies for £24.50 in London. I guess I could just tell them I don't want to fly, I just want to "play with the buttons" :P

Related questions and answers
  • This might sound like a silly question to some, but is it possible to go and sit in the cockpit of a Boeing 737, somewhere in the UK? (Otherwise in Europe, or beyond). Maybe at a museum or something? I'm building a [currently tiny] home cockpit based on a 737, and I'd like to see how the real thing looks and feels. I tried searching online, but I couldn't find anything. Hope this isn't too dumb of a question, i.e. "not possible Jim!"

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