Seating distribution in passenger aircraft

André Stannek
  • Seating distribution in passenger aircraft André Stannek

    Recently I was checking in to a flight and was asked if I'd like a window or aisle seat as usual and choose a window seat. I was then told that there are no more window seats available but I could get an aisle seat without someone sitting next to me and then just take that window seat. The plane was an ATR-72 so the rows were 2+2 seats.

    I know about weight distribution to the front/back but I couldn't come up for a good reason to do this. What could be the reason for not giving me that apparently free window seat right away?

  • My advise is before checking-in, make sure you find out the type of an aircraft you are flying with. After that you can check the seat allocation - there are numerous websites on the topics - usually the seat guru dot com would suffice.

Related questions and answers
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