Why don't they have two black boxes?

Arian
  • Why don't they have two black boxes? Arian

    Why is it that black boxes don't float?

    From what I gather the answer is:

    So they will not float away from a water crash site. The ping can be heard underwater with sonar. Finding the ping, finds the site.

    But why not have two black boxes one that floats and one that stays with the aircraft?

    That way if a plane is lost at sea, if we find the black box floating, we could use the data to find the other black box and the crash site. Plus the benefits of having a redundancy are enormous.

  • The added weight, space, and complexity of a second recorder have to be taken into account, and all are very important for an airplane.

    If you are just interested in location, then there could just be a simple beacon designed to float. Although less, this will still have the above costs. And you have to design something light enough to float, sturdy enough to survive an extremely violent crash, yet still be a functional electronic device.

    Considering that the situation of a lost aircraft at sea is fairly rare, it is questionable whether the benefits justify the costs.

Related questions and answers
  • Why is it that black boxes don't float? From what I gather the answer is: So they will not float away from a water crash site. The ping can be heard underwater with sonar. Finding the ping, finds the site. But why not have two black boxes one that floats and one that stays with the aircraft? That way if a plane is lost at sea, if we find the black box floating, we could use the data to find the other black box and the crash site. Plus the benefits of having a redundancy are enormous.

  • . This is just so we can find plane crashes in the sea when we don't know precisely where they went down (and to get basic data when the black boxes are too deep to get to immediately). Malaysian flight... would help find water crashes sooner, but if you add a simple USB memory stick in the center, then have data similar to the current FDR's being fed into it, then finding one of the floaties would give...Without getting into the mess of redesigning existing Flight Data Recorders, I have a simple proposal that I think would help in deep water crashes. I propose that several floating cushion sets

  • that radio beacon. We have not yet picked up anything, but that's typically what those black boxes contain." I was under the (potentially incorrect) impression that flight recorders, by nature of the materials needed to protect their contents in the event of a crash, are quite dense and unable to float in water. I base this impression on news reporting of other airliner crashes (such as Air France 447, which crashed in the Atlantic), where the recorders were found some time later on the ocean floor. Additionally, it seems reasonable to me that one would want to have the recorders not float so

  • I never knew much about airplanes before the tragic incident of Malaysia 370. I have been spending a lot of time on Twitter reading various articles and investigations; in one of the articles I read, they stated that unlike transponders, "black boxes" cannot be turned off. However, each ELT is specifically designed for each aircraft, so it cannot be tampered with. You also cannot turn off the black box, as it runs throughout the flight, recording every 30 to 60 seconds. Is it really impossible to turn off the black boxes from within the plane?

  • As I understand, there are two black boxes on-board an aircraft. One black box, the Cockpit Voice Recorder holds the cockpit conversations and the other, the Flight Data Recorder holds essential flight parameters. But why are the two black boxes holding separate data? Why don't both black boxes hold copies of both the FDR and the CVR data for extra redundancy in case the other box goes missing or is completely damaged by the crash? Are there any technical reasons for why this isn't possible or hasn't been attempted yet? Is there any benefit of having the CVR and FDR in separate boxes?

  • Do the manufacturers who build airplanes use their own "black boxes" in the planes, or are there companies whose sole purpose is to develop black boxes? For example, in 2010 in the Airblue Flight 202 incident, the black box had to be sent to Germany for data recovery: He stated that the box would be examined by "foreign experts" in Germany or France as Pakistan does not possess... to the Bureau d'Enquêtes et d'Analyses pour la Sécurité de l'Aviation Civile (BEA) in France. It is not clear who developed that black box. Was it the same company that manufactured the airplane? Also, can

  • plane was fine, and I can't find any Part 61 regulations that are specific to experience in one make/model aside from adding an experimental aircraft as part §61.63(h)(1), which is what I assume...I'm a student pursuing a US Private Pilot License, and recently scheduled my checkride. I've been training in a 1981 Piper Warrior (PA-28-161), but if its annual goes sour I may have to take my club's 1980 Piper Archer (PA-28-181). I have well over §61.109's 40 hours in the Warrior alone, and only ~10 hours in the Archer. I have a separate club checkout and CFI solo endorsement for each

  • Is it possible to rent a float plane with a private pilot's license? Flying floats is one of the main attractions for me to learn to fly. However, after some searching on the internet I can only find wheeled aircraft that are available for rent in my area. Am I missing something? Are there flying clubs or partnerships that have float planes available? I would love to fly floats but owning a seaplane is not in the cards for me at this point in my life.

  • Several such devices can be placed anywhere in the aircraft and can deploy when they float up to the surface and are exposed to sunlight. It would be much easier to find underwater crash sites. I don't think it's too expensive to make. Certainly cheaper than searching with ships and other planes for days (as in the case with MH370 and the Airbus that crashed into the Atlantic ocean).

  • a simple explanation of the above case. Edit: I am attaching two screen shots of two sets of equations from two sources. Links to the books are included below. Both sources state these are longitudinal equations of motion although their general form differ from each other. I think I got to understand one point: these equations were derived considering translation motion on the x and z planes and rotation about the y axis (so stated in the first book) Thereafter, I don't understand the procedure. 1st set of equations from book 1: second set of equations from source 2: book1: pg

Data information