What can the Flight Attendant Panel do?

Danny Beckett
  • What can the Flight Attendant Panel do? Danny Beckett

    I've noticed that on some airlines (I may have seen it on SAS) the cabin crew had a small touchscreen at the front of the plane which they were using to select recorded audio messages etc, in both their language, and English.

    Searching the internet, I found out it's called a Flight Attendant Panel — here are some photos I found:

    So I gather they can control the lighting, and movies; but what else can these panels do?


    I also found a FAP trainer, which says:

    This virtual training environment generates a realistic FAP representation including OBRM, CAM and PRAM

    What are OBRM, CAM and PRAM? What is being displayed above?

  • Here is an interesting presentation that discusses most of the communications systems on the A320 family (looks like the pictures you have and should apply in general). The CIDS (cabin interphone distribution system) starts about halfway through on page 21. The FAP is part of this system and can control:

    • Passenger reading lights
    • Passenger call buttons
    • Cabin lighting controls
    • Cabin system monitoring/testing
    • Passenger entertainment system
    • Passenger address (PA)
    • Automatic announcement and boarding music
    • Cabin/Service interphone and calls
    • EVAC signal
    • Emergency light
    • Door bottle pressure monitoring (either oxygen or escape slide?)
    • Door proximity sensors (doors closed properly)
    • Smoke detection
    • Water and waste tank quantities

    The acronyms you listed are:

    • Cabin Assignment Module (CAM)
      • All the software for specific customer layouts and defined parameters in the FAP (same as OBRP).
    • On Board Replaceable Module (OBRM)
      • This is a generic term for any module that is easily replaceable. In this case it refers to the module that contains all the information used by the FAP (same as CAM).
    • Prerecorded Announcement and Music (PRAM)

    A good list of Airbus acronyms including these can be found here.

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