US VIP International TFR

mah
  • US VIP International TFR mah

    In the US, there's a TFR everywhere a designated VIP (US president or vice president) is going to be. When (most?) foreign VIPs visit the US, I don't think there are TFRs in place for them (unless the location coincides with our VIPs).

    Are there TFRs (or international equivilents) in other countries when the US VIPs are there?

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