Cri-Cri as cheap twin time builder

user2105469
  • Cri-Cri as cheap twin time builder user2105469

    I was looking at potential experimental projects when I read this fascinating website about a tiny aerobatic-capable twin-engine airplane. It's light enough to be an ultralight, but much too fast:

    Aside from the obvious fun of flying this little plane, I wondered whether:

    1. I'd be able to log time in the Cri-Cri as multi-time? My guess is yes.

    2. Assuming I'm MEL-IFR, could I log multi-IFR with a two-way radio, altimeter, Dynon-type AI, HI and at least one cert. VOR & glide slope? An approach cert. GPS setup would be too heavy I assume. My guess is this is wishful thinking...

  • Yep, as long as your avionics are certified and you follow all the rules for experimental aircraft in IFR you can log it. It's questionable whether or not anyone would accept the time when you go to get a job, but they might.

    I would imagine that you're right about the avionics weight, although glass might actually reduce the weight.

  • What a positively delightful looking aircraft!

    I see no reason you couldn't log time in this as multi-engine time - it clearly has two engines, with two separate sets of controls (at least throttles, from what I can see).

    Similarly I see no reason you couldn't fly it IFR as an experimental aircraft, provided it's "properly equipped" (consult the FARs for all the details on what you need), passes an IFR pitot/static test, and has appropriate radios (Transponder which you'd likely need anyway, Com, and Nav).
    Whether you'd want to take it up in real weather is another matter though :-)

    For that matter if you want GPS you could certainly have it without much weight penalty: throw in a Garmin GNS 430W and cover the Nav/Com and GPS in one ~7-8lb box. Whether or not that kind of investment in what's basically a single-seat super-ultralight is "worth it" is a judgment call only you could make, but it definitely seems possible.

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