What are the sport-pilot self-certification standards?

kyryx
  • What are the sport-pilot self-certification standards? kyryx

    Consider a hypothetical pilot who knows they have a medical condition which the FAA considers disqualifying (under the standard medical qualification standards). Is that pilot permitted to operate under sport-pilot privileges if they do not believe their condition interferes with their ability to safely perform their sport piloting duties? Must that pilot consult with a private physician? If so, must the physician offer some sort of approval?

    The FAA has a similar question on the FAQ, but doesn't seem to answer it fully. They "suggest" consultation with a physician. Does that suggestion indicate a pilot who does not do so is in violation of a FAR?

    edit: This question is concerning operation of a powered airplane.

  • Unless the pilot has had their certificate revoked or suspended by the FAA for their medical condition or has failed an application for a medical certificate1, they would probably be fine after seeing a physician. FAR 61.23(c)(2) states that sport pilots using a driver's license to satisfy medical requirements must:

    (ii) Have been found eligible for the issuance of at least a third-class airman medical certificate at the time of his or her most recent application (if the person has applied for a medical certificate);

    (iii) Not have had his or her most recently issued medical certificate (if the person has held a medical certificate) suspended or revoked or most recent Authorization for a Special Issuance of a Medical Certificate withdrawn; and

    (iv) Not know or have reason to know of any medical condition that would make that person unable to operate a light-sport aircraft in a safe manner.

    If the holder has a valid US driver's license, it would (presumably) be taken upon the certificate holder to have "reason to know" by virtue of having a checkup with a physician to check that this condition does not affect their ability to fly safely, especially if the person involved was in any sort of doubt as to their medical condition.

    However, if they have had a checkup with a physician that finds no particular issues, and that condition does not affect the validity of their driver's license, they should be fine.

    1: By section (ii), the pilot must still have a medical test and pass for at least a Class 3 medical certificate, if the FAA has revoked or found unsatisfactory their previous medical under a Class 1 or Class 2 certificate.

Related questions and answers
  • Consider a hypothetical pilot who knows they have a medical condition which the FAA considers disqualifying (under the standard medical qualification standards). Is that pilot permitted to operate under sport-pilot privileges if they do not believe their condition interferes with their ability to safely perform their sport piloting duties? Must that pilot consult with a private physician? If so... indicate a pilot who does not do so is in violation of a FAR? edit: This question is concerning operation of a powered airplane.

  • 14 CFR 61.55 says: ... (d) A person may receive a second-in-command pilot type rating for an aircraft after satisfactorily completing the second-in-command familiarization training requirements under paragraph (b) of this section in that type of aircraft provided the training was completed within the 12 calendar months before the month of application for the SIC pilot type rating. The person must comply with the following application and pilot certification procedures: ... (6) The applicant must appear in person at a FAA Flight Standards District Office

  • , 2015. (A reference for this would be great.) Question: As the holder of an FAA pilot license, with the above FAA issued medical, may I legally fly outside of the US after January 1st 2015...FAA Rule: The duration of FAA medical certificates is specified in 14 CFR 61.23. An example would be for: A first-class medical certificate Applicant is under age 40 Applicant is an airline... of the date of examination shown on the medical certificate. So this clearly states that if I pass my medical on January 1st 2014 then my medical is good until the end of the day on January 31st 2015

  • I will most definitely start a training for a glider pilot license at our local flight club. This of course requires a medical certification for pilots. The only concern I have, is my blood pressure. I am an 18 year old male with an overall healthy condition. However the last few times I had a doctor's appointment, I had a somewhat high blood pressure (it was always between 150/70 - 180/85 mmHg). Online I haven't really found that much information about the limit of the blood pressure in order to still get the Medical. I have found some sources saying that everything below 220/125 is good

  • in which the crewmember is to serve since the beginning of the 12th calendar month before that service. This section does not apply to a certificate holder that uses only one pilot in the certificate holder's operations. Before that though, 14 CFR 135.323 states: ยง135.323 - Training program: General. ... (b) Whenever a crewmember who is required to take recurrent training under... it in the calendar month in which it was required. ... So let's say that I completed initial training in March. This says that if I complete recurrent training in February or April

  • After answering this question on History.SE, I started to wonder if it would be possible to find out even more detail about the plane now that its serial number is known. I have no idea what kind of flight records the US Army Air Corps kept, however. I know most flight logs today are kept by pilot, but I imagine there would be some way to trace what pilots flew a particular plane. I have no idea if this is possible for USAAC trainer planes in the 1930s. Could I get access to these records? If so, how would I go about it? I'm mostly interested in seeing if I can find out more information

  • For instance, I don't remember paragraph 61.51(e)(iii) at all from way back when I studied it to determine when I could log PIC time. I'm fairly certain that it has been added since then (actually, there was no sport pilot license back then so I know that it has at least been changed), but I would like to know when it was changed and what the changes were. At the bottom of the reg, it includes... FR 42549, Aug. 21, 2009; Amdt. 61-128, 76 FR 54105, Aug. 31, 2011] This tells me when it was amended, but not what was amended. Does the FAA make that information available?

  • What are the minimum requirements for obtaining a privates pilot certificate if a pilot already has a sport pilot certificate? The requirements for a private pilot certificate don't changes because you already have a sport pilot license. However by successfully obtaining a sport pilots certificate, you should have already completed some of the private pilot requirements. How much of your sport pilot training counts towards your private pilots license? How much of the training will have to be re-done? Does it depend on the type of your flight instructor's certificate?

  • Please note that I'm not asking about getting a certificate good enough for flying a wide-body passenger jet (see related question). Rather, I'm asking about getting from zero flying experience to an actual pilot/co-pilot job at a major US airline (AA/Delta/UA/Southwest). Perhaps some regulatory organization maintains such a statistics? Or even the airlines themselves? I'm well aware that people can have various career paths (from ex-military pilots to guys who paid for 10000 flights hours out of their pockets), but with 40,000+ pilots employed by major airlines there must

  • portion of the recurring training (essentially an IPC) is conducted under the supervision of a CFII, can I complete it without a current medical certificate? ...In the last year, I have had to undergo bypass surgery. I am fully recovered now (and past the mandatory 6-month waiting period), but have just been apprised by my AME that my 3rd class medical deferral is likely to take a month or two for the FAA to process. I am also in a partnership, and our insurance requires annual recurring training. Normally, all four of us (partners) take the recurring

Data information