Aged aircraft type ratings

Fabrizio Mazzoni
  • Aged aircraft type ratings Fabrizio Mazzoni

    Looking around on the internet you can still find a lot of aged aircraft such as the 727,737-200,a300/310, DC9/MD8X and DC-10 that are still being used as freighters or in "poorer" airlines.

    I suppose a lot of pilots that were certified on these aircraft are getting older and retiring. Would it make sense for a younger guy to get certified for these airplanes rather than running for a newer aircraft certifications where the competition would be harsher in order to pursue a career?

    I suppose that these aircraft will still have service time left as converted freighters thus extending the retirement dates further on in time.

  • It doesn't really make sense to "go and get" a type rating for any large aircraft. A type rating on a 727 would be very expensive for most people, when the airline that needs pilots will likely train you when you're hired. If the bulk of people that have the rating are gone, and the airline needs pilots, it will either have to be very patient when searching for pilots, or it will train new pilots.

Related questions and answers
  • Aged aircraft type ratings Fabrizio Mazzoni

    Looking around on the internet you can still find a lot of aged aircraft such as the 727,737-200,a300/310, DC9/MD8X and DC-10 that are still being used as freighters or in "poorer" airlines. I suppose a lot of pilots that were certified on these aircraft are getting older and retiring. Would it make sense for a younger guy to get certified for these airplanes rather than running for a newer aircraft certifications where the competition would be harsher in order to pursue a career? I suppose that these aircraft will still have service time left as converted freighters thus extending

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