Detailed information on squawk codes 7?00, i.e. reason for emergency

Styler
  • Detailed information on squawk codes 7?00, i.e. reason for emergency Styler

    I have recently been using a mobile app to track flights, which is really cool. I live in the rural heartland of America, so it's an event for me to see an A380 actually flying.

    Every once and a while a squawk 7700 alert will come up, which I understand is the emergency transponder code. There are more, such as 7600 and 7500, which I find are less common.

    My question is, is there a way to do some post-mortem followup as to why the aircraft squawked the code? Is this public information that can be found by some agency such as the NTSB?

  • This FAA webpage has a list of the various transponder codes and what they are used for, which will give you an idea of what the problem is. Unless there is an actual aircraft incident or accident which requires the FAA to investigate though, you won't be able to find a record of it. In fact, pilots aren't even required to file a report unless requested, and those don't go into a public database.

    For actual incidents or accidents, you can look at the NTSB Accident Database & Synopses.

    For pilot reports to the NASA ASRS self-reporting safety system, you can search their database. If the pilot filed a report then you will see it show up there.

    Commonly used emergency codes are:

    • 7500 - Hijack Code
    • 7600 - Loss of Radio Communications Code
    • 7700 - Emergency Code

    Also, some countries use the code 7000 for VFR traffic (which is not an emergency code), but the US uses 1200 instead.

Related questions and answers
  • I have recently been using a mobile app to track flights, which is really cool. I live in the rural heartland of America, so it's an event for me to see an A380 actually flying. Every once and a while a squawk 7700 alert will come up, which I understand is the emergency transponder code. There are more, such as 7600 and 7500, which I find are less common. My question is, is there a way to do some post-mortem followup as to why the aircraft squawked the code? Is this public information that can be found by some agency such as the NTSB?

  • I'm from Brazil, and here we use the West/East rule, so we use an odd flight level when we fly between 0/360 - 179, and when we fly between 180 - 359 we fly in an even flight level. But what should you do in other countries? Where I can find those rules? I've heard that in Europe it's totally different, and that in some countries in Asia they use meters, instead of feet. Where can I find this information?

  • Let's say that we're directly west of CATLI and have been cleared direct CATLI for the RNAV approach. We load the approach into the GNS430 and proceed direct the fix. After crossing CATLI outbound for the hold-in-lieu-of-procedure-turn, we realize that we want to stay in the hold for a few more turns. How do I tell the 430 that I don't want it to sequence to ZAMGI upon arrival at CATLI?

  • On SIGWX charts, it shows pairs of symbols with, say, */** or **/**. I know what the symbols mean on either side, but why are there two, and what does the slash indicate? Would love good resources that explain more, too. Example chart here, from the FAA sample questions (caution: 37 MB download), Figure 20, over Southern California. I’m also interested in knowing what a dot with R underneath means.

  • Wind information can be reported by various sources (ATIS, METAR, TAF, spoken on the radio, etc). I was taught that officially some of these sources are relative to magnetic north and others to true north (although practically this isn't always followed). Which sources are supposed to use which reference system?

  • an airline couldn't introduce a cabin in which some or all passengers travel in a reclining, rather than sitting, position? Seems to me that it would be more comfortable (except for claustrophobes and those who really need to work during the flight). The enclosed space would inherently reduce some of the risks of passengers being thrown around in turbulence or an emergency landing; safety belts (or cargo restraint webbing? I'm not sure I'm joking) could handle the remaining risk. No, I don't really think it would be commercially viable ... but I'm wondering whether folks who actually Know

  • I was looking at http://www.gelib.com/aeronautical-charts-united-states.htm, where you can download shape files for Google Earth that show US airspaces. I'm writing some software that has a similar... with no luck. The link I referenced above says its source was the National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO), which I'm having very little luck finding as well. I think it may have been renamed, thus the poor results. I also called the FAA and can't seem to find anyone there that knows where to transfer me. So, does anyone here have any helpful pointers on finding said information? I want to pull

  • that it must be engaged, or even operative. Simply "equipped", and also that this is to approve an aircraft for RVSM. From what I can find, there is no operational requirement for the autopilot to actually be working or engaged. Assuming that my MEL allows me to defer the autopilot and still fly, can I fly in RVSM airspace? Some people however say that if you are in RVSM airspace

  • Runway numbers in most of the world are based on the runway's orientation relative to magnetic north. For example a runway with a magnetic heading of 135° to 144° will be numbered 14, and one with a magnetic heading of 145° to 154° will be numbered 15. Runway numbers are occasionally changed due to changes in the Earth's magnetic field. At my home field Runway 14/32 is oriented 145.7°/325.7°, per the FAA's airport diagram, and it has been this way for some time (I first recall noticing it over a year ago). My understanding is that this runway should, at some point, be renumbered 15/33

  • In the AFD there is occasionally a ‡ symbol after the operating hours for control towers (and other time information) like what's shown below. What does the ‡ symbol represent?

Data information