Has the cause of the engine failure of Cessna's 182JT-A been determined?

Terry
  • Has the cause of the engine failure of Cessna's 182JT-A been determined? Terry

    Last August during a certification flight, a Cessna 182JT-A compression-ignition (diesel) engine failed in flight. I've been Googling to find the cause of the failure and the status of the certification process but have failed to find any recent info. Does anyone know what the current findings have been and how Cessna expects to proceed?

  • Apparently, yes, it has -- see Cessna 182 JT-A Certification 'Imminent'. As the article reports, the issues appeared to be related to the turbocharger, but I'm not sure how far (if at all) accident reports or details go beyond that.

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