Which countries permit pilots to carry a firearm?

Danny Beckett
  • Which countries permit pilots to carry a firearm? Danny Beckett

    In the US, the FFDO programme trains and permits pilots to carry a firearm in the cockpit.

    Do any other countries have a similar programme?

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