Minimum specs of a telescope for viewing Aircraft?

Styler
  • Minimum specs of a telescope for viewing Aircraft? Styler

    We are thinking about buying a telescope for viewing planets, stars, the moon, and aircraft! What is the absolute minimum zoom and/or size to achieve getting a good glimpse of an aircraft at its cruising altitude?

    Does anyone have experience doing this that they could share to help us out?

  • I would not recommend a telescope for viewing aircraft.
    As others have pointed out, a telescope that is suitable for astronomy would be incredibly overpowered for viewing aircraft - the aircraft would move out of the viewing frame very quickly, and you would have a difficult time tracking them.

    I would suggest picking up a spotting scope (the kind of thing bird watchers and hunters use - good ones can be had in the 50 to 100 dollar price range, and excellent ones abound from about $100 up), or a pair of good binoculars for your plane watching. The zoom factor is far better suited to plane spotting, and either option would be substantially more portable than a full telescope rig.

    As for advice on a telescope, there is an Astronomy stack exchange site, and while the entire network generally doesn't do "product recommendations" the Astronomy site's chat might be a good place to ask for advice on picking a telescope. (I'm not sure how active their chat room is, but it's worth a shot!)

Related questions and answers
  • I thought that you had to perform all your ATPL multi-crew time in aircraft with a certificated minimum of 2 crew, but I've heard of some pilots using time in single-pilot aircraft towards their EASA ATPL licence. Is this true? If so, could someone explain how is this possible?

  • actually are (or, as most pilots prefer to think, you're lower than what your altimeter reads) Have a look at this VOR approach into Newark Most altitude restrictions are a minimum level, so... procedures using this kind of restrictions have a minimum temperature?

  • We are thinking about buying a telescope for viewing planets, stars, the moon, and aircraft! What is the absolute minimum zoom and/or size to achieve getting a good glimpse of an aircraft at its cruising altitude? Does anyone have experience doing this that they could share to help us out?

  • Not factoring learning curve, personal safety minimums, and pilot proficiency, what is the absolute minimum flight time that must be logged in order to carry a passenger in a piston engine aircraft in the United States? I'm am looking for an answer for the airplane category. Not gliders or ultralights.

  • FAR 135.385 requires that at your destination airport your flight planning shows that you could make a full-stop landing "within 60 percent of the effective length" of the runway when flying transport-category turbine-powered aircraft. For piston-powered aircraft FAR 135.377 has a similar 70% rule. How do you calculate minimum runway lengths under these rules? Can you use 80% of the runway? What if the runway is wet?

  • As I understand it, the FAA certifies certain aircraft types for IFR flight in general. All aircraft of that type are then certified, not something you have to do with each individual aircraft. What are the minimum requirements for aircraft to be certified for IFR? Is it all location-sensing equipment? And a bonus: can I get a single aircraft that is only VFR certified to be IFR certified if I add more equipment?

  • As we all know from our instrument training, the MOCA is: MINIMUM OBSTRUCTION CLEARANCE ALTITUDE (MOCA)- The lowest published altitude in effect between radio fixes on VOR airways, off-airway routes, or route segments which meets obstacle clearance requirements for the entire route segment and which assures acceptable navigational signal coverage only within 25 statute (22 nautical) miles of a VOR. Whereas the MEA is: MINIMUM EN ROUTE IFR ALTITUDE (MEA)- The lowest published altitude between radio fixes which assures acceptable navigational signal coverage and meets obstacle

  • ? Are they perhaps more susceptible to a flat spin than a regular design (even if those risks can be kept to an acceptable minimum)?

  • For normal sightseeing flights in a typical hot air balloon, what instruments or avionics does the pilot usually carry? Do balloons have a minimum equipment list?

  • There is a lot of confusion around what it means to have ADS-B. What is the minimum equipment required to meet the mandate? Can I use a Stratus to meet that requirement?

Data information