Medical certification and high blood pressure

Padarom
  • Medical certification and high blood pressure Padarom

    I will most definitely start a training for a glider pilot license at our local flight club. This of course requires a medical certification for pilots. The only concern I have, is my blood pressure.

    I am an 18 year old male with an overall healthy condition. However the last few times I had a doctor's appointment, I had a somewhat high blood pressure (it was always between 150/70 - 180/85 mmHg). Online I haven't really found that much information about the limit of the blood pressure in order to still get the Medical.

    I have found some sources saying that everything below 220/125 is good, but I think those sources we're only speaking about passengers of airplanes, not pilots.

    For your info: I live in Germany, and I suppose there are other regulations regarding the medical in other countries, but overall I think the requirements don't differ that much.

    Hopefully someone can tell me if I should be concerned or if my blood pressure is still okay to fly.

  • Without knowing German, it's a little difficult for me to research the LBV's website, but I found this application for Validation of a foreign airman’s licence, and one of the requirements in it is:

    Valid JAR-FCL Medical Class I or Class II

    The JAR requirements for a Class I and Class II medical, both are:

    JAR–FCL 3.135 Cardiovascular system – Blood pressure

    (a) The blood pressure shall be recorded with the technique given in paragraph 3 Appendix 1 to Subpart B [at each examination].

    (b) When the blood pressure at examination consistently exceeds 160 mmHg systolic and/or 95 mmHg diastolic, with or without treatment, the applicant shall be assessed as unfit.

    (c) Treatment for the control of blood pressure shall be compatible with the safe exercise of the privileges of the applicable licence(s) and be compliant with paragraph 4 Appendix 1 to Subpart

    B. The initiation of [ ][medication] shall require a period of temporary suspension of the medical certificate to establish the absence of significant side effects.

    (d) Applicants with symptomatic hypotension shall be assessed as unfit.

    It looks like you will probably need to lower your blood pressure (either via diet and exercise or with medication) in order to pass your medical. If you start taking blood pressure medication, you will need to take it for a certain period of time to make sure that there are no other side effects before they will give you a medical. You can discuss this with a medical examiner to see how the process works there.

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