Maneuvering speeds per TCDS

dazedandconfused
  • Maneuvering speeds per TCDS dazedandconfused

    I've been looking at the data found in various type certificate data sheets and found something that is a bit ambiguous. In reading a TCDS (like this one, for example) in the "airspeed limits" section it lists the maneuvering speed. But they don't make it clear whether they are referencing the design maneuvering speed (Va) or the Maximum operating maneuvering speed (Vo)

    Can anyone clarify which one they are referencing?

  • The speeds that they list in your linked TCDS (along with their corresponding V speeds) are:

    • Never exceed 171 mph (148 knots) CAS - VNE
    • Maximum structural cruising 140 mph (121 knots) CAS - VNO
    • Maneuvering 129 mph (112 knots) CAS - VA
    • Flaps Extended 115 mph (100 knots) CAS VFE

    For a list of these V Speeds along with their definitions, see 14 CFR 1.2

Related questions and answers
  • Maneuvering speeds per TCDS dazedandconfused

    I've been looking at the data found in various type certificate data sheets and found something that is a bit ambiguous. In reading a TCDS (like this one, for example) in the "airspeed limits" section it lists the maneuvering speed. But they don't make it clear whether they are referencing the design maneuvering speed (Va) or the Maximum operating maneuvering speed (Vo) Can anyone clarify which one they are referencing?

  • Another enthusiast question. I watch a lot of the National Geographic Channel's "Air Crash Investigation", for better or worse, and it seems accident investigators make tremendous use of the Cockpit Voice Recorder "CVR" and Flight Data Recorder "FDR" to determine the chain of events leading up to- or the root cause of an accident. One of the more recent episodes of ACI (Season 12 Ep. 13... technology for maintenance data (and I think I recall hearing Boeing does too), I was wondering if either Airbus, Boeing, or the FAA, plan to facilitate or mandate that the CVR and FDR record

  • I was looking through my virtual radar logs one of the days and found this "glitchy" ADS-B behavior. I am almost 100% sure that this is not due to my antenna or setup since two independent different radars confirmed this weird behavior from FlightRadar24. Also A/C before and after this one did not exhibit this behavior. Does anybody have any thoughts as to what may be happening??? Why... of occurrence is approximately: 3/16/2014 6:09pm CST I have also verified FlightAware is ALSO showing the same weird glitch. See below "yellow" highlighted airplane: Same A/C from FlightRadar24

  • There are various services that use world-wide Boeing Winds for forecast wind data which can be used to calculate an approximate flight time between two locations. They usually have best case, worst case, and average case for each location, altitude, and date in the future. I have searched and searched Google to no avail. Where can this wind data be found, and how can it be used in a commercial product? For those of you who don't know what the Boeing winds are, I found this description of their software product on am informal message board (not related to Boeing): PC WindTemp

  • If an incident occurs on board an aircraft in flight which could be considered as criminal in one country, what decides which country the incident falls under? For example, if a man was found to be in possession of "virtual" child pornography and not all of the countries involved consider that to be illegal, which country is the one who decides whether the person have broken the law or not?

  • In aeroelasticity, there are three main phenomena that one should take care of: divergence, aileron reversal and flutter. Each of them has an associated speed at which the phenomenon might start to occur. During wind-tunnel tests it is possible to increase the flutter speed to have access to the divergence speed first by using some small masses smartly placed on the wing. This is due to the fact that usually flutter speed is smaller than divergence speed. Is it always the case for aircraft (without additional masses on the wing)? If not do you have any example? If yes do you have

  • I've found a 737 maintenance planning data document produced by Boeing, which gives a suggested schedule on page 6. I've also found a British Airways Fact Book document, which on the last page gives a schedule. So who decides how often an aircraft and its individual components should be inspected? Is it the manufacturer, the airline, or somebody else? Is there a set standard or does this differ between manufacturers/airlines/countries?

  • I've read a lot of NTSB crash reports regarding small, GA aircraft (just trying to figure out what went wrong and what to avoid.) There seem to be a lot of reports that talk about "low altitude high speed stalls" happening on approach. What is a high speed stall, and how is it created? What is the best way to avoid one? As they seem to cause a lot of GA accidents...

  • In a flight database that I'm working with on a project, there is a column of data called "flightCategory" with values "C", "G", "T", etc. Any idea what those actually mean? From what I understand, the database is from FAA. But I'm not 100% sure.

  • Why is it that black boxes don't float? From what I gather the answer is: So they will not float away from a water crash site. The ping can be heard underwater with sonar. Finding the ping, finds the site. But why not have two black boxes one that floats and one that stays with the aircraft? That way if a plane is lost at sea, if we find the black box floating, we could use the data to find the other black box and the crash site. Plus the benefits of having a redundancy are enormous.

Data information