Looking for the name of a physical phenomenon in fluids' mechanics

Mehdi
  • Looking for the name of a physical phenomenon in fluids' mechanics Mehdi

    I have not even an idea about how I would search for that on Google, that is why I'm trying my chance here. As electrical engineer I have no clue about fluid mechanics. We all now that when water is pumped very fast into firefighters tube, it gets very rigid and tends to be straight. What is this effect called, I'm interested in doing some research about the forces applied by such a tube from its initial folded position to the final position.

    Thanks

Tags
Related questions and answers
  • I have not even an idea about how I would search for that on Google, that is why I'm trying my chance here. As electrical engineer I have no clue about fluid mechanics. We all now that when water is pumped very fast into firefighters tube, it gets very rigid and tends to be straight. What is this effect called, I'm interested in doing some research about the forces applied by such a tube from its initial folded position to the final position. Thanks

  • After answering this question on History.SE, I started to wonder if it would be possible to find out even more detail about the plane now that its serial number is known. I have no idea what kind of flight records the US Army Air Corps kept, however. I know most flight logs today are kept by pilot, but I imagine there would be some way to trace what pilots flew a particular plane. I have no idea if this is possible for USAAC trainer planes in the 1930s. Could I get access to these records? If so, how would I go about it? I'm mostly interested in seeing if I can find out more information

  • serves as the starting point. What is the starting point or what are the principles used to derive these equations? If I know how to derive these equations for a very simple case, then I know I have... and rotation about the y axis (so stated in the first book) Thereafter, I don't understand the procedure. 1st set of equations from book 1: second set of equations from source 2: book1: pg...I hope this is a relevant place for me to ask a math question regarding aircraft design. I am trying to understand how one would implement a controller to control the pitch angle of an airplane

  • (or cargo restraint webbing? I'm not sure I'm joking) could handle the remaining risk. No, I don't really think it would be commercially viable ... but I'm wondering whether folks who actually Know...The airlines are always trying to jam more passengers into each plane. I'm smaller than today's average, and I'm still often uncomfortable in a standard Economy seat. It occurred to me... an airline couldn't introduce a cabin in which some or all passengers travel in a reclining, rather than sitting, position? Seems to me that it would be more comfortable (except for claustrophobes

  • As a private pilot I have zero knowledge about how big jets are being flown so I was a little surprised to see that smaller Airbuses (A32x) only use spoilers for roll control on final approach. During the initial phase of the approach ailerons are being used but at a certain point they stay put in the neutral position and roll is controlled by the spoilers. When I mentioned this to the pilot when exiting the aircraft he was a little annoyed by the question and he said I must have seen it wrong. I've seen this numerous times since then so I'm pretty sure I wasn't mistaken. Is this actually

  • I'm very interested to learn if there are (m)any (major) (commercial) airports that have runways further away from the terminal(s) than Schiphol's Polderbaan. Which airport is "in the lead" in this respect? The northern end of the Polderbaan, the last runway to be constructed, is 7 km (4.3 mi) north of the control tower, causing taxi times of up to 20 minutes to the terminal. [...] Newest runway, opened 2003. Located to reduce the noise impact on the surrounding population; aircraft have a lengthy 15-minute taxi to and from the Terminal. Wikipedia

  • by spinning (yaw). I wonder about a different mode, though; if a quadcopter could maintain a very high degree of pitch, then the flight is closer to a very short 4-engine X-wing aeroplane. This would be the advantage of a tiltrotor; after takeoff, rotate into the near-vertical position and permit much higher rates as we are no longer limited by usual helicopter dissymetry of lift arguments. Is this possible? Are there other modes beyond the capacities of traditional aircraft? E.g. yaw spinning in the forward pitch position, coast-and-burn by varying the pitch periodically to switch between

  • I'm interested in short, or trick, take-offs - such as from platforms, tall trees, etc. I think that I should have a wind speed and direction measure an understanding of my wing surface area This will let me add to my intuition from regular launches (from sites with known-good launch conditions), and estimate how much velocity I need to add via a run / push. The methodology to count the wind measure seem a bit more grey, right now. I can have a sense of the wind where I am, but it may quickly change beyond my launch site. Since I'm considering how to launch from a stationary

  • , and with good cause): "Tower; Arrow-23: Did you forget about me?" only to have the tower come back with a snappy and frustrated: "I'm doing the best I can. I'll get you all out of here as fast as I...(background: low-hour, low-experience, private pilot.) I've got an issue regarding talking to air traffic controllers, especially when I think they may have messed up, yet still giving them the respect they deserve as hard working professionals. One common scenario is when I'm ready to go, along with multiple other planes, all coming from various taxiways. I know the tower tries hard to clear

  • I was looking at http://www.gelib.com/aeronautical-charts-united-states.htm, where you can download shape files for Google Earth that show US airspaces. I'm writing some software that has a similar need and need to find a source for this data. I'm looking for data that defines the extents of airspaces including MOAs, restricted areas, etc. I have been pouring through the FAA's website with no luck. The link I referenced above says its source was the National Aeronautical Charting Office (NACO), which I'm having very little luck finding as well. I think it may have been renamed, thus

Data information