Does night takeoff & landing currency count for daytime currency?

newmanth
  • Does night takeoff & landing currency count for daytime currency? newmanth

    My initial thought is that night currency satisfies daytime currency, but what gives me pause is FAR 61.57(a)(2) notes that a non-current pilot is allowed to conduct day VFR or day IFR flights without passengers to obtain currency. There is no mention of night flight being allowed. This seems to imply that day flights are required for daytime currency.

  • Yes, night landings satisfy the requirements of §61.57(a)(1) for both nighttime and daytime currency.

    The wording of the regulation is not crystal clear, and some (including me) have thought that the wording of (a)(2) required daytime landings for daytime currency. This is not the case, per the following interpretation from the FAA (Springfield, IL FSDO, dated 16 April 2014):

    Please note, in this section, there is no mention of a day or night differences in the regulation.

    In 14 CFR 61.57(b) the regulation specifically mentions the requirement for Night Takeoffs and Landings and the time period they can be completed in. If the passenger carrying will be done at night, the additional requirements of 14 CFR 61.57(b) must be met.

    The night takeoffs and landings, as required by 14 CFR 61.57(b), will qualify for both the day and night requirement, provided all other requirements are met. The day takeoffs and landings will NOT qualify for the night (section (b)) requirement though.

    Stanley E. Swank II
    Aviation Safety Inspector
    Springfield, IL FSDO, AGL-19

    Other sources on the Internet agree with this interpretation:

    ... your three takeoffs and landings to a full stop at night will also fulfill the recent flight experience requirements for day currency.

  • FAR 61.57(a)(2) is for the purpose of fulfilling (a)(1). Meaning, if you are out of day currency than you must make day landings. If are day current, then night landings will qualify to continue your day currency.

  • Yes, night landings count for day currency.

    61.57(a)(1) explains:

    Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, no person may act as a pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers or of an aircraft certificated for more than one pilot flight crewmember unless that person has made at least three takeoffs and three landings within the preceding 90 days.

    Period. That's it.

    Night currency limitations simply add an extra caveat to the above: you have to have done the landings to a full stop.


    But what about 61.57(a)(2)? It clearly says day VFR or day IFR?

    Your question is slightly misleading. (a)(2) talks about how to regain currency after you've already lost it...and the quote in your question is incorrect. You said this:

    a non-current pilot is allowed to conduct day VFR or day IFR flights without passengers to obtain currency

    No!

    The reg actually says:

    provided no persons or property are carried on board the aircraft, other than those necessary for the conduct of the flight.

    A non-current pilot is allowed to act as pilot in command in order to become current, so long as nobody is carried other than those individuals who are necessary for the conduct of the flight. Such as the first officer, a flight instructor, or an examiner.


    So why is there the day limitation?

    Because there's no restriction on multi-crew operations at night.

    61.57(a)(1)

    Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, no person may act as a pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers or of an aircraft certificated for more than one pilot flight crewmember unless that person has made at least three takeoffs and three landings within the preceding 90 days,

    vs

    61.57(b)(1)

    Except as provided in paragraph (e) of this section, no person may act as pilot in command of an aircraft carrying passengers during the period beginning 1 hour after sunset and ending 1 hour before sunrise, unless within the preceding 90 days that person has made at least three takeoffs and three landings to a full stop during the period beginning 1 hour after sunset and ending 1 hour before sunrise, and

    If you need to get current in a multi-crew airplane, you can. (a)(2) says so. You don't need to get current in a multi-crew airplane at night, because there's no restriction on multi-crew operations at night.

Related questions and answers
  • My initial thought is that night currency satisfies daytime currency, but what gives me pause is FAR 61.57(a)(2) notes that a non-current pilot is allowed to conduct day VFR or day IFR flights without passengers to obtain currency. There is no mention of night flight being allowed. This seems to imply that day flights are required for daytime currency.

  • When I learned to fly helicopters, I of course spent significant time learning about and practicing autorotations. The CFI at my school, who had around 15,000 hrs (that's right, fifteen thousand!) said a few times that practice, knowledge and currency are vital — but as long as you got the entry right (following which you can fly to the ground) and executed at least a decent attempt... might not get to use the machine again, and you might spend some time in hospital, you would live to fly another day. I am assuming a reasonable place on dry land is available to finally come to rest

  • In a full motion Level C or D simulator like those used by the airlines and for jet type ratings: How should a pilot log the simulator time in their logbook? I.e. Can you log: Total Time Instrument Time Time in Type Cross Country Time Night Time Landings (including night landings) Dual given/received Anything else?

  • FAR 61.57 (a) requires that one must make 3 takeoffs and landings within the preceding 90 days in order to carry passengers. Does a "crash landing" count for the 61.57 currency? By "crash landing" I mean a landing on which an incident/accident occurs under the NTSB definitions. For example, if I'm in the circuit to gain 61.57 currency, and on my 3rd landing attempt, I crash the aircraft into a tree well short of the runway. Would I then be allowed to go rent another aircraft and carry a passenger?

  • Part 135 instrument currency in a Jet aircraft requiring two pilots, requires both pilots to be instrument current. But how about the same situation for a Part 91 flight? Does the SIC need to have his 6 approaches with tracking, intercepting, holding etc... in the last 6 months?

  • EASA requires pilots to log night time and night landings seperate in the personal logbook. Now I'm not sure in which period of time a landing is a night landing and flight time is night flight time. I would appreciate your answer, mabe also with a trustworthy source.

  • FAR 61.57 says that you need to have completed three takeoffs and landings to a full stop in order to carry passengers at night. However, you only need three touch-and-gos in order to carry passengers during the day. Why the difference? Is there some rationale for this? Are full-stop landings considered safer during the night?

  • In January 2013, a python hitched a ride on plane, unfortunately exposed on the wing after getting sucked out of its hiding place. Qantas 191 is a Cairns → Port Moresby flight on a DHC-8-400, probably the first of the day. Having done walk-arounds for a Cherokee, I would like to think that I wouldn't allow such an event to happen on a small plane. On the other hand, I realize that it would... inspection of the flaps that would have allowed the snake to have been spotted?

  • Let's say I want to get night current again, but I haven't flown at night recently so I hire an instructor to fly with me. If I don't count PIC time I don't see a problem, I would just log it as dual instruction. But if I log PIC time, is the instructor considered a passenger? If so I wouldn't be able to have the instructor with me since I am not night current. Is there an exception for flying with an instructor?

  • After September 11th, the FAA required all Part 135 air carrier flights to prefix their registration number with a "T" and use the "Tango November" prefix on the radio. Every once in a great while (about once to twice a year) I still hear someone doing this, but surely there are more 135 flights than this. Is it (or was it ever) required to use the "T" prefix for Part 135 flights?

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