Are aircraft sounds publicly available in a repository?

Danny Beckett
  • Are aircraft sounds publicly available in a repository? Danny Beckett

    Referring to the automated callouts and sounds made by the , , , , etc. — are these available to download in one repository at all? For any aircraft, Airbus or Boeing.

    Understandably, these may not be freely available, but I'm curious otherwise too (e.g. the likes of Air Crash Investigation must do this).

Related questions and answers
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